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Now Broadcasting from Your Google Glass

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Corinne Warnshuis
    A group of women try out Google Glass at Philly Tech Week 2014.

    Google Glass wearers will now be able to stream whatever they see and hear and share it with friends.

    The Livestream video-sharing app became available this week, offering Glass users the ability to video all they see and share it with other Livestream account holders, according to Wall Street Journal. The app starts filming when users say, "OK, Glass, start broadcasting."
    The idea is that users can use the app to share their experiences at concerts or events, or even as a "teaching tool during surgery," the WSJ reported.  However, if users want to broadcast all over the Web, then that's $399 a month. 
    Privacy activists have already protested Google's wearable device loaded with a camera and the Internet because it could easily film others without their knowledge. "Obviously, there are privacy concerns with Google Glass," said Livestream Chief Executive Max Haot. "But if you think of it more as a professional tool, we think it has a great future."
    The app doesn't allow "unlawful, obscene or pornographic" video, so at least there's that.
    A Google spokesman said  the company is sensitive to the privacy issues and is allowing users to provide feedback about the device. It also forbids sexually explicit and "illegal material" on Google Glass, along with no facial-recognition software.
    Google has reasons to be careful about video on Google Glass. Already there's been backlash against the device, partially from the $1,500 device being a metaphor for the haves versus the have-nots in San Francisco, but also because people don't want to be filmed or photographed without their knowledge or consent in bars or other places.