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Flaws in Redistricting

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Propositions 11 and 20 promised to change the political landscape of California by redrawing district lines based on non-partisan, objective criteria. But the data used to draw some of those lines may have been flawed, according to Dr. Michael Ward of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission. (Published Sunday, Aug 21, 2011)

    Propositions 11 and 20 promised to change the political landscape of California by redrawing district lines based on non-partisan, objective criteria.

    But the data used to draw some of those lines may have been flawed, according to Dr. Michael Ward of the California Citizens Redistricting Commission.

    A key basis for building the redistricting maps were what Ward called "main themed wrap-ups" where map makers compiled data from the communities they visited and then "boiled it down"  to a main theme.

    "There's no question that part of the data that the commission was presented,"  said Ward, "was incorrect, was just flat wrong."

    Despite the errors in the wrap-ups, Ward said the commissioners used the data to draw district lines.

    "When I tried to follow up on it, it took weeks later after several versions of the maps had been built and completed," Ward said, " to determine in fact there was no input that supported those main themes."