The Cove
Deep coverage of the Giants

Bonds Has Advice for Lincecum, Wants to Work for Giants

Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images

    Ever since Barry Bonds retired and ended up being tried by the federal government for perjury, the Giants haven't been shy about creating some distance from the slugger and the organization.

    So it's a little surprising to hear that Bonds is interested in working for the Giants organization.

    Per Daniel Brown of the San Jose Mercury News, Bonds is interested in applying his baseball knowledge to the Giants on-field product and has had talks with Giants CEO Larry Baer about actually joining the organization. No, really.

    "If you believe that I can contribute and help the organization, then fine," Bonds said. "If you don't, fine. I'm just saying it's out there."

    The quick response here probably involves something of the LOL variety, and that's totally reasonable. Can you imagine the eyebrows that would be raised if Bonds started working with the Giants hitters and they all responded by slamming home runs into McCovey Cove?

    Fair or not, that's what would happen. (Although there is precedent here -- Mark McGwire worked with the Cardinals.) But just in case there's too much skepticism, Bonds has a selling point to really draw the Giants interest.

    The slugger thinks he can fix what's wrong with struggling ace Tim Lincecum.

    "If Lincecum wants the answers, I'll give them to him," Bonds said.

    It's hard to imagine what sort of knowledge Bonds can offer a pitcher, but if you (like me) believe Lincecum's problems are mental, than perhaps Bonds could actually provide some nice insight into improving the Freak's game.

    Regardless, it would be fascinating to see the dynamic between the coaching version of Bonds -- always noted for being surly -- and the clubhouse and media.

    Perhaps most interestingly would be the response from fans. Bonds' star has lost its luster since his retirement, but it's possible that him coming back around the Giants organization could remind fans of his heyday playing in AT&T.

    And if he can fix Lincecum, well, fans might forgive just about everything.