Corey Haim Mourned as Mom's 911 Call is Released

"I think my son is dead," Judy Haim says in emotional call

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    HOLLYWOOD - MARCH 19: Actor Corey Haim arrives at the 3rd Annual Avant Garde Fashion Show at Boulevard3 on March 19, 2009 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images)

    Family and friends laid Corey Haim to rest in Toronto on Tuesday, the same day authorities released the harrowing 911 call Haim's mom placed in a frantic effort to save the former child star.

    Click here for audio of the 911 call.

    "I think my son is dead," Judy Haim is heard telling the dispatcher on the March 10 call. "What's going on? I can't stay calm. I don't know what's going on."

    During the call, the actor’s cancer-stricken mother is coached through CPR until paramedics arrive at her Oakwood Apartment complex, just north of Hollywood.

    "This is ridiculous. He had a fever today; that's it," she says.

    Haim reportedly had flu-like symptoms in the days before his death, including a 101-degree fever. A doctor checked him and ordered bed rest. A report has yet to be released, but Judy Haim has said she was informed by the county coroner last week that her son died of pulmonary congestion. 

    "Hang in there, stay calm, and keep doing compressions," the dispatcher tells her on the 911 call.

    Meanwhile, more than 200 mourners reportedly gathered in Haim’s native Toronto Tuesday to witness his funeral.

    Cops escorting “The Lost Boy” actor’s hearse saluted him at every intersection between the mortuary and the gravesite, Access Hollywood reported.

    One notable no-show was Haim’s best-buddy Corey Feldman, who said Monday he was planning a separate memorial.

    Feldman, who shot to fame alongside Haim in a string of classic '80s films including "The Lost Boys" and "License to Drive," instead penned a blog post Tuesday titled "A Letter for the Grave... (an open letter to Corey Haim)."

    “I miss you so much already,” he wrote. “When I think of something funny I don't know who to tell it to. I find myself trying to call you but then remember your not there. I think about the new movies we will soon be doing together and then suddenly realize [sic] that the dream is over.”