Michelle Obama Reflects on Leaving White House on 'Colbert,' Gives Barack Impersonation | NBC Bay Area

Michelle Obama Reflects on Leaving White House on 'Colbert,' Gives Barack Impersonation

When Colbert asked if she had sympathy about Melania Trump's Republican National Convention speech, she deadpanned, "yeah that was tough"

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    Michelle Obama reflected on her last eight years as the first lady during an appearance on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.”

    “It’s definitely bittersweet,” Obama said Tuesday night about her husband’s presidency coming to an end. “Everything is the last.”

    She continued, "I find myself choking up cause we have raised our kids in the White House. We've had so many amazing experiences."

    And one of the main things she remembers are the mistakes she made.

    “Oh god, so many of them. They usually involved pronouncing someone’s name wrong,” she told Colbert.

    But along with the struggles of pronouncing people’s names, there were many perks that she relished, including a “sleepover at Buckingham Palace.”

    “They have some good fries at the palace,” she noted.

    She also revealed to Colbert that both she and their two daughters — Malia and Sasha — have developed impersonations of the president.

    Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

    Michelle Obama offered her version of the president’s way of talking over dinner when all she and Sasha want to do is talk about “our favorite song on the Lemonade album." 

    She gave an example of Barack being asked by Malia about global warming -- which would trigger a long-winded explanation.

    "I'm glad you asked that," Michelle said in an impersonation of her husband. "Let me just answer that in three points." 

    On the current presidential campaign between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, Colbert wondered if Michelle had any sympathy for the candidates' spouses who have to stand by their partners.

    "No not really," she said. "Because you have to be in it and if you don't agree you should've agreed before they ran."

    She continued, "Bottom line is if I didn't agree with what Barack was saying I would not have supported his run so I stand there proudly and I hope they are too."

    When Colbert asked if she had sympathy about Melania Trump's Republican National Convention speech -- which had borrowed heavily from Michelle's own speech -- she deadpanned, "yeah that was tough."