Grammy-Winner Kendrick Lamar Discusses Disappearance of Childhood Friend in Compton | NBC Bay Area

Grammy-Winner Kendrick Lamar Discusses Disappearance of Childhood Friend in Compton



    Grammy-winning rapper Kendrick Lamar returned to his hometown of Compton and spoke out about a local producer who has been missing for nearly a year. Jane Yamamoto reports for the NBC4 News at 6 on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016. (Published Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016)

    Nearly a year after a music video producer disappeared from Compton, hip hop artist Kendrick Lamar spoke for the first time about his connection to the missing 29-year-old.

    Raymond Collins, also known as Ray Rich, was last seen on Feb. 16. Collins had come to his hometown to discuss filming a music video with a client he'd worked with several times before.
    Collins was last seen at 2 a.m. driving away from the area of Alondra Boulevard and Dwight Avenue (map). An hour later, witnesses saw another man getting out of Collins' car on Raymond Street. No one has seen or heard from Collins since.

    Lamar, also a Compton native, said when they were kids growing up in Compton they shared the same dream of making it in the music industry. The Grammy winner reunited with the parents of his childhood friend in Compton Saturday as he was honored with a key to the city.

    Annie Collins and her husband shared a moment with their son's childhood friend.

    "We just shared the same dreams," Lamar said. "It was me, Raymond and a few other guys."

    The two-time Grammy winner still remembers his childhood friend Raymond Collins, who also aspired to make it in the music industry.

    "We believe someone here in city of Compton knows something," Annie, Raymond's mother, said.

    Her son grew up in Compton and even though they moved to Chino 10 years ago, he still came back to produce music videos.

    On the day he disappeared, sheriff's investigators say Collins met up with a friend to discuss a music video, and was last seen around 2 a.m.

    Collin's car was parked along Raymond Street a few blocks away from his friend's house.

    "My son's been missing for a year," Annie said.

    Raymond's father, still holding out hope that someone will come forward, handed out fliers Saturday in search of clues pointing toward his son.

    "When you grow up with someone, you have genuine love for them," Lamar said. "Still to this day a year later, I feel faith and hope."