"Colbert Report" to Honor Returning U.S. Troops

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Chicago's Second City" gave Stephen Colbert, 45, his first start as an understudy for Steve Carell.

    Stephen Colbert is going to salute the U.S. troops coming home in his own unique way.

    His namesake Comedy Central vehicle ,"The Colbert Report," will run a two-night special to mark the end of combat operations in Iraq, loaded with guest appearances from big name politicians like Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Jim Webb as well as U.S. military commander in Iraq, Gen. Ray Odierno.

    The special episodes, dubbed "Been There: Won That: The Returnification of the American-Do Troopscape, " will air September 8 and 9 and the live audience is expected to be filled with Iraq War vets and active duty troops. Other soldiers from around the world will be beamed in via satellite from Afghanistan and the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

    Odierno famously shaved Colbert's head — on President Barack Obama's orders — when the comedian broadcast four episodes of "The Report" from Baghdad last year. On that visit, Colbert donned a camouflage suit and reported from a desk supported by sand bags.

    The 4th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, which exited Iraq on Wednesday, officially was designated the last combat brigade to leave Iraq under Obama's plan to end combat operations there by Aug. 31. Some 50,000 members will stay another year in what is designated as a noncombat role.

    Though Colbert's normal mode is satire, he's a strong supporter of the troops.

    With the WristStrong bracelets he's promoted since falling while running around his desk and breaking his wrist, he has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the Yellow Ribbon Fund, a charity that assists injured service members and their families. He's a board member of DonorsChoose.org, which is raising money for the education of children of parents in the military.

    "Sometimes," Colbert said earlier to The Associated Press, "my character and I agree."