<![CDATA[NBC Bay Area - Inauguration]]> Copyright 2014 http://www.nbcbayarea.com/feature/inauguration http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/nbc_bayarea_blue.png NBC Bay Area http://www.nbcbayarea.com en-us Thu, 24 Apr 2014 08:37:19 -0700 Thu, 24 Apr 2014 08:37:19 -0700 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[More Than 8,000 Take Part in Inaugural Parade]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 04:35:04 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obamas6.JPG

President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle Obama paraded down Pennsylvania Avenue Monday, waving to cheering crowds of thousands after the president was sworn in for his second term in office.

The first couple were shown stepping out of their escort car at two points along the Washington, DC route from the Capitol to the White House. Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Jill also walked a portion of the parade. NBC's Al Roker scored a handshake from Biden as he walked by -- and Roker marked his coup by dropping his microphone and saying, "I'm done."

 

 

More than 8,000 people and nearly 200 animals took part in Monday’s 57th inaugural parade.

The parade featured eight floats. Marching bands and military units representing the country’s Armed Forces were among the 60 groups that participated in the historic parade, the Presidential Inaugural Committee announced.

The Obamas and Bidens later watched the processional from a reviewing stand at the White House.

Here was the order of the parade, courtesy of the Inaugural Committee.

The Presidential Escort
The Presidential Escort is a military and civilian formation that escorts the President, Vice President, and their families from the Capitol to the White House following the swearing-in ceremony. The escort will include representatives from the five branches of the United States Military, elected officials, and local and national law enforcement organizations.
 

Division One
United States Army Staff
United States Army Field Band
United States Military Academy
United States Army 1st Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment
United States Army Color Guard
District of Columbia Army National Guard
United States Army Reserve 200th MP Command
Punahou High School Marching Band and JROTC Color Guard, Hawaii
Hawaii Home State Float
Isiserettes Drill & Drum Corps, Iowa
Caisson Platoon, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment
Miami University Marching Band, Ohio
Illinois Home State Float
South Shore Drill Team, Illinois
Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, South Carolina
Kamehameha Schools “Warrior” Marching Band, Hawaii
Ambulance 255 Project, Connecticut
81st Regional Support Command Wildcats, South Carolina
Jackson Memorial High School “Jaguar” Band, New Jersey
Seguro Que Si, Florida
Kansas University Trumpet Ensemble, Kansas
 

Division Two
United States Marine Corps Staff
United States Marine Band “The President’s Own”
United States Marine Corps Active Company
United States Marine Corps Color Guard
United States Marine Corps Reserve Company
Chinese American Community Center Folk Dance Troupe, Delaware
Delaware Home State Float
University of Maryland “Mighty Sound of Maryland” Marching Band, Maryland
Pennsylvania Home State Float
Boy Scout Troop 358, Germantown, Pennsylvania
Palm Springs High School "Spirit of the Sands" Marching Band and Visual Corps, California
Ballet Folklórico De La Raza, Colorado
54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company A, Massachusetts
Utuqqagmiut Dancers, Alaska
A Therapeutic Equine Assisted Self-Confidence Experience (A.T.E.A.S.E.), Wisconsin
Palmview High School Mariachi and Folkloric Group, Texas
NASA - Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Curiosity Rover
Dobyns-Bennett High School Band, Tennessee
54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company B, Maryland
Boston College “Screaming Eagles” Marching Band, Massachusetts
 

Division Three
United States Navy Staff
United States Navy Band
United States Naval Academy
United States Navy Active Company
United States Navy Color Guard
United States Navy Reserve Company
Georgia State University Marching Band, Georgia
Martin Luther King, Jr. Float
Ballou Senior High School "Majestic" Marching Knights, District of Columbia
Multi-Jurisdictional Mounted Police Drill Team and Color Guard, Michigan
Calera High School “Eagle” Marching Band, Alabama
Gym Dandies Children’s Circus, Maine
Boston Crusaders Drum & Bugle Corps, Massachusetts
Civil Rights Float
Lesbian and Gay Band Association
Native American Women Warriors, Colorado
Little Rock Central High School Band, Arkansas
Utah Hispanic Dance Alliance, Utah
Central Valley High School Marching Band and Color Guard, Washington
 

Division Four
United States Air Force Staff
United States Air Force Band
United States Air Force Academy
United States Air Force Active Company
United States Air Force Color Guard
District of Columbia Air National Guard
United States Air Force Reserve Company
Grambling State University “Tiger” Marching Band, Louisiana
Tuskegee Airmen Float
Norwich University Regimental Band, Vermont
Montana Delegation, Montana
Wind River Dancers, Wyoming
Canine Companions for Independence
Navajo Nation Band, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico
United War Veterans Council, New York
Pearl River Community College Marching Band, Mississippi
Union High School Air Force JROTC, Oklahoma
Fergus Falls High School Marching Band, Minnesota
Northwest Dragon and Lion Dance Team, Oregon
Asheville High School Marching Band, North Carolina
 

Division Five
United States Coast Guard Staff
United States Coast Guard Band
United States Coast Guard Academy
United States Coast Guard Active Component
United States Coast Guard Color Guard
United States Coast Guard Reserve Component
United States Merchant Marine Academy Staff
United States Merchant Marine Academy Band
United States Merchant Marine Academy Color Guard
United States Merchant Marine Academy Company
Northern State University “Marching Wolves,” South Dakota
Military Spouses of Michigan, Michigan
Londonderry High School Marching Band and Color Guard, New Hampshire
Culver Academies, Indiana
Portsmouth High School “Patriots” Marching Band, Rhode Island
The Native American Tribes of North Dakota, North Dakota
Liberty North High School Band, Missouri
Sarpy County Nebraska Metro Area Law Enforcement Honor Guard, Nebraska
Frankfort High School Marching Band, West Virginia
Comparza Morelense, Nevada
Letcher County Central High School Marching Band, Kentucky
Our People, Our Future Float & Citizen Co-Chairs
Firefighters of Idaho, Idaho
Virginia Military Institute, Virginia



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[White House Photographers Take on the Presidential Inauguration]]> Wed, 23 Jan 2013 15:45:08 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/180*120/_psa1525.jpg From behind-the-scenes to inside the limo, a team of White House photographers offer an intimate glimpse of the events around the 57th presidential inauguration. ]]> <![CDATA[Inaugural Ball Benefits Staffer Who Died During Campaign]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 21:03:06 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Alex+Okrent.jpg

Though most of the inaugural events are now recent memories, there was at least one more important presidential ball on Tuesday, the proceeds of which benefit an Obama staffer who died during the campaign.

Alex Okrent, 29, died in July after collapsing at President Barack Obama's 2012 headquarters in Chicago. He worked in the campaign's paid media department, which handles advertising. He'd been with Obama since 2004, working as a field organizer in the campaign for the U.S. Senate and then for the 2008 presidential campaign.

Tickets to Tuesday night's Staff Ball at the Washington Convention Center were priced at $10 apiece. Obama for America staff, White House and Administration Staff, as well as Presidential Inaugural Committee staff were invited.

Obama told the Thousands that they represent, in his words, his "deepest hopes for America." He said he knows the nation's future is in good hands. The first lady, wearing a silver and black ensemble, echoed the president's campaign-year chant of "fired up, ready to go."
 
Singers Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga performed.  The pop star noted the event on Twitter, with a simple post that read, '#whitehausball."

The president and first lady started the tradition of the Staff Ball in 2009 as a way to express gratitude to their staff and celebrate with them.

]]>
<![CDATA[Same-Sex Couple Welcomes Obama's Remarks]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 09:44:10 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/gaymarriage4.jpg

President Barak Obama's delivered a welcome surprise on Monday during his inauguration speech to many same-sex couples, especially in the Bay Area.

The president made it clear gay rights will be a be part of his agenda during his second term when he said: "Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated equal under the law."

Frances Rainin-Stevens of San Francisco said she was pleasantly surprised when she heard that. She and her partner, Jen Rainin-Stevens, said "I do" in 2009 and have two kids, but not a legally recognized marriage.

The couple is hopeful 2013 will be the year same-sex couples are allowed to have equal rights.

Frances Rainin-Stevens said: "To have a president actually say he believes we should be treated equal is extremely moving."

Political analyst Larry Gerston said the president made it clear he wants to act on gay rights: "He wants to keep this on the front burner. They can act on this in several ways. There are a couple of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, not only that but Congress can act on gay rights too."

Added Francis Rainin-Stevens: "This may be the year we actually get legally married."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Panoramic View of Obama's Second Inauguration]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 09:09:35 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama-takes-oath.jpg

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Obama's Lookalike A Hit on the Mall]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 14:16:29 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/7257025_M6PWILKINSOBAMAIMPERSONATORPKG_722x406_15254595809.jpg A man who makes a lot of money as a President Barack Obama impersonator was in D.C. Monday for the real Commander in Chief's inauguration.]]> <![CDATA[The Best Fashion From the Inaugural Balls]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 06:04:52 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_dance_P6.jpg What did First Lady Michelle Obama wear to the Inaugural Ball? See the best gowns, tuxes and more from the night's festivities.

Photo Credit: WireImage]]>
<![CDATA[Obama, First Lady Dance to "Let's Stay Together"]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 06:08:33 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_dance_P5.jpg

With the more rigid formalities of Inauguration Day behind him, President Barack Obama took to the dance floor Monday night to share his first dance of his second term with the woman he said he was "lucky to have."

Wearing a white bow tie, a small American flag pin on his lapel, and a giant grin, President Obama spoke glowingly about his wife before introducing her at the Commander-In-Chief Ball—the first of two official balls the couple would attend for the night.

"She inspires me every day. She makes me a better man and a better president," Obama said to service members and their families in attendance. "The fact that she is so devoted to taking care of our troops and our military families is just one more sign of her extraordinary love and grace and strength. I'm just lucky to have her."

And then there she was. Michelle Obama made her grand entrance in a custom Jason Wu ruby red chiffon and velvet gown. She grabbed his hand and the two headed for the dance floor to the sound of cheers.

Jennifer Hudson, in a long black gown, provided the soulful music—Al Green's "Let's Stay Together."

The first couple sang to each other, Michelle Obama snapped her fingers and the president leaned in and playfully smirked at his wife. And they shared a kiss before breaking off to dance with some of the luckiest guests in the room.

After the dance, Michelle Obama took to her new Twitter account and documented the moment: "Just danced to "Let's Stay Together" with the love of my life and the President of the United States. I’m so proud of Barack. –mo."

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Inauguration Highlights]]> Fri, 01 Nov 2013 09:54:54 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/inaugural_late_P8.jpg See a roundup of the day's events, including Obama's inaugural address, Beyonce's rendition of the national anthem, and the first lady's look.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[President and First Lady Walk Down Pennsylvania Avenue]]> Fri, 01 Nov 2013 09:54:54 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_inaugural_Mon_P19.jpg President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama walk down Pennsylvania Avenue during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Video Scrapbook: Obama's Oath, Inauguration Music and More]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 09:34:23 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_inaugural_Mon_P18.jpg

Barack Obama took the Oath of Office for his second term as President of the United States Monday, kicking off many Inauguration Day festivities across Washington, D.C.

During Obama's speech, which lasted just over 18 minutes, he outlined a broad agenda of gun control, equal rights and immigration reform during his second term and told the thousands of people in attendance that "our journey is not complete."

Watch videos from the swearing-in ceremony above and below:

 

Beyonce Performs the National Anthem: 

 President Takes Oath of Office:

James Taylor Sings "America The Beautiful":
 

 

Obama's Inaugural Speech: "Our Journey is Not Complete":

Obama Impersonator Draws Attention at Inauguration: 

 

Richard Blanco Recites Inauguration Poem: 

 

Kelly Clarkson Sings "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" At Inauguration: 

 

President and First Lady Walk Down Pennsylvania Avenue: 

 

First Lady Inauguration Style: 

New Day in Washington:

 

Obama Soaks in Crowd, Says "I’m Not Going to See This Again": 

 

Obama's First "Exclusive Interview" Goes to Al Roker: 

 

Al Roker Scores a Big Hello from Joe Biden: 

Malia Obama Photobombs Sister's Cell Phone Pic:

 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Bay Area Celebrates Inauguration]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 12:47:56 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/160*160/inaug6.jpg Bay Area residents attended the presidential inauguration ceremonies in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21, 2013.

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Castro Valley High]]>
<![CDATA[Richard Blanco Recites Inauguration Poem]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 12:42:48 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/richard2.jpg Miami-raised poet Richard Blanco recited a poem of unity that evoked his childhood and the spirit of America.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[First Lady Inauguration Style]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 12:27:10 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_sworn.jpg First Lady Michelle Obama is wearing a navy Thom Browne coat and dress.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Kelly Clarkson Sings "My Country, 'Tis of Thee" At Inauguration]]> Fri, 01 Nov 2013 09:54:54 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/kelly7.jpg Clarkson was accompanied by the United States Marine Band.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Poet Recites Stirring Inauguration Poem]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 13:23:19 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/AP977265514824.jpg

Miami-raised poet Richard Blanco recited a poem of unity that evoked his childhood and the spirit of America at the second inauguration of President Barack Obama on Monday.

The poet, who was born in Spain to Cuban exiles, recited his poem "One Today" at the ceremonial swearing-in of President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.

Click Here to Read the Full Poem

Blanco, 44, is the youngest inaugural poet and the first Latino and gay inaugural poet.
 
Blanco's parents emigrated to New York City days after he was born, then settled in Miami. He later attended Florida International University and now lives in Maine.

Before the inauguration, Blanco said he was speechless when he was told he'd be delivering the original poem, according to the Miami Herald.

"It took me 10 minutes to remember what the word for inauguration is in Spanish," Blanco told the Herald.

He also spoke about his mother, Geysa, a Cuban exile who gave him strength.

"She is a very brave woman and has worked hard all her life for my brother and me," Blanco said.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Beyonce Performs the National Anthem]]> Wed, 23 Jan 2013 04:31:29 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_inaugural_Mon_P16.jpg Pop star Beyonce performs the National Anthem at President Barack Obama's second inauguration. After the performance, there have been questions about whether the singer lip-synced.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[President Obama Takes the Oath of Office]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 17:27:38 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_sworn.jpg President Barack Obama takes the oath of office at his second inauguration.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[James Taylor Performs "America the Beautiful"]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 11:31:49 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/edt-james-taylor-159768745.jpg Singer James Taylor takes the stage during President Barack Obama's second inauguration to perform "America the Beautiful."]]> <![CDATA[Obama's Inaugural Speech: "Our Journey is Not Complete"]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 11:31:36 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama-speech-one.jpg "Our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers and our daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts," Obama said. "Our journey is not complete until all our children ... know they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm. That is our generation's task."]]> <![CDATA[Inaugural Moments You May Have Missed]]> Tue, 22 Jan 2013 07:21:56 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/president+inauguration+thumb.jpg

President Barack Obama's second inauguration was a blur of politicians, celebrities, pomp and ceremony. As the moment unfolded, there were a few things that happened they may have escaped your eye:

  • Obama became the first president ever to mention gay rights during his inaugural address, giving a call out to Stonewall, the New York City bar where the gay rights movement began in the early '70s, and declaring that "Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law."

  • Strange enough was the sight of Jay-Z, a one-time drug dealer turned rap superstar from the projects of Brooklyn, and Beyoncé, the "sexiest woman of the 21st Century," standing next to Newt and Callista Gingrich at a presidential inauguration. Truly bizarre was this screengrab of what appears to be Republican Rep. Peter King snapping a cellphone photo of Jay-Z and Beyoncé.
     
  • Much was made of the fact that Justice Antonin Scalia wore a rather peculiar hat to President Obama's first inaugural. Well, the conservative firebrand didn’t disappoint, sporting an even more unusual hat this time. But the attention heaped on Scalia's chapeaus — including the #scaliaweirdhat hashtag — seems to be ideologically driven, as liberal Stephen Breyer sported a hat at each Obama's inaugurations to little fanfare or derision.
     
  • Well before their father came out, First Daughters Malia and Sasha Obama were in the stands, spending much of the time chatting with their cousin Avery Robinson. But at one point, the spirit moved Malia, who suddenly busted a move (h/t to Buzzfeed for the requisite animated GIF).
     
  • Myrlie Evers-Williams, widow of civil rights martyr Medgar Evers, was called upon to deliver the Inaugural Prayer, offering a moving call for a blessing on all our leaders and our armed forces. She also made the biggest gaffe of the day, referring to Obama as the 45th president (he's actually number 44), but like a pro, she just kept going.
  • As Obama left the stage following the oath of office, he stopped and turned to soak in the moment. "I want to take a look one more time, I'm not going to see this again," he said to someone off camera. Obama then stood there taking in the scene as Vice President Joe Biden and others filed past.

 

  • Al Roker scored the unofficial first post-swearing-in interview with President Obama, screaming loud enough to get a thumbs up from the Commander in Chief, and moments later managed to yell sufficiently to get Vice President Biden to run over and shake his hand. Yes, Roker dropped the mic when it was over.

  

  • In another inauguration first, the First Family was caught in their private box before the parade began, fiddling with their cellphones. Obama was trying to be as inconspicuous as possible while scrolling through messages on his phone, finally being interrupted by eldest daughter Malia, who insisted he repeatedly kiss Michelle until she got a decent photo with her own phone.

 



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Richard Blanco's Inaugural Poem: Full Text]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 11:33:39 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/159834701.jpg

One Today


One sun rose on us today, kindled over our shores,
peeking over the Smokies, greeting the faces
of the Great Lakes, spreading a simple truth
across the Great Plains, then charging across the Rockies.
One light, waking up rooftops, under each one, a story
told by our silent gestures moving behind windows.

My face, your face, millions of faces in morning's mirrors,
each one yawning to life, crescendoing into our day:
pencil-yellow school buses, the rhythm of traffic lights,
fruit stands: apples, limes, and oranges arrayed like rainbows
begging our praise. Silver trucks heavy with oil or paper-
bricks or milk, teeming over highways alongside us,
on our way to clean tables, read ledgers, or save lives-
to teach geometry, or ring-up groceries as my mother did
for twenty years, so I could write this poem.

All of us as vital as the one light we move through,
the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day:
equations to solve, history to question, or atoms imagined,
the "I have a dream" we keep dreaming,
or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won't explain
the empty desks of twenty children marked absent
today, and forever. Many prayers, but one light
breathing color into stained glass windows,
life into the faces of bronze statues, warmth
onto the steps of our museums and park benches
as mothers watch children slide into the day.

One ground. Our ground, rooting us to every stalk
of corn, every head of wheat sown by sweat
and hands, hands gleaning coal or planting windmills
in deserts and hilltops that keep us warm, hands
digging trenches, routing pipes and cables, hands
as worn as my father's cutting sugarcane
so my brother and I could have books and shoes.

The dust of farms and deserts, cities and plains
mingled by one wind-our breath. Breathe. Hear it
through the day's gorgeous din of honking cabs,
buses launching down avenues, the symphony
of footsteps, guitars, and screeching subways,
the unexpected song bird on your clothes line.

Hear: squeaky playground swings, trains whistling,
or whispers across café tables, Hear: the doors we open
for each other all day, saying: hello, shalom,
buon giorno, howdy, namaste, or buenos días
in the language my mother taught me-in every language
spoken into one wind carrying our lives
without prejudice, as these words break from my lips.

One sky: since the Appalachians and Sierras claimed
their majesty, and the Mississippi and Colorado worked
their way to the sea. Thank the work of our hands:
weaving steel into bridges, finishing one more report
for the boss on time, stitching another wound
or uniform, the first brush stroke on a portrait,
or the last floor on the Freedom Tower
jutting into a sky that yields to our resilience.

One sky, toward which we sometimes lift our eyes
tired from work: some days guessing at the weather
of our lives, some days giving thanks for a love
that loves you back, sometimes praising a mother
who knew how to give, or forgiving a father
who couldn't give what you wanted.

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always-home,
always under one sky, our sky. And always one moon
like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop
and every window, of one country-all of us-
facing the stars
hope-a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it-together



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[President Barack Obama's Inaugural Address: Transcript]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 13:02:05 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/AP802029104843.jpg

As Prepared for Delivery

Vice President Biden, Mr. Chief Justice, Members of the United States Congress, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens:

Each time we gather to inaugurate a president, we bear witness to the enduring strength of our Constitution. We affirm the promise of our democracy. We recall that what binds this nation together is not the colors of our skin or the tenets of our faith or the origins of our names. What makes us exceptional - what makes us American - is our allegiance to an idea, articulated in a declaration made more than two centuries ago:

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."

Today we continue a never-ending journey, to bridge the meaning of those words with the realities of our time. For history tells us that while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing; that while freedom is a gift from God, it must be secured by His people here on Earth. The patriots of 1776 did not fight to replace the tyranny of a king with the privileges of a few or the rule of a mob. They gave to us a Republic, a government of, and by, and for the people, entrusting each generation to keep safe our founding creed.

For more than two hundred years, we have.

Through blood drawn by lash and blood drawn by sword, we learned that no union founded on the principles of liberty and equality could survive half-slave and half-free. We made ourselves anew, and vowed to move forward together.

Together, we determined that a modern economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce; schools and colleges to train our workers.

Together, we discovered that a free market only thrives when there are rules to ensure competition and fair play.

Together, we resolved that a great nation must care for the vulnerable, and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortune.

Through it all, we have never relinquished our skepticism of central authority, nor have we succumbed to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. Our celebration of initiative and enterprise; our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, are constants in our character.

But we have always understood that when times change, so must we; that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges; that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. For the American people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than American soldiers could have met the forces of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. No single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. Now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people.

This generation of Americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. A decade of war is now ending. An economic recovery has begun. America's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands: youth and drive; diversity and openness; an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. My fellow Americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it - so long as we seize it together.

For we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. We believe that America's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. We know that America thrives when every person can find independence and pride in their work; when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. We are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else, because she is an American, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of God but also in our own.

We understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time. We must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools, and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, and reach higher. But while the means will change, our purpose endures: a nation that rewards the effort and determination of every single American. That is what this moment requires. That is what will give real meaning to our creed.

We, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. But we reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. For we remember the lessons of our past, when twilight years were spent in poverty, and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. We do not believe that in this country, freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few. We recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us, at any time, may face a job loss, or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. The commitments we make to each other - through Medicare, and Medicaid, and Social Security - these things do not sap our initiative; they strengthen us. They do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great.

We, the people, still believe that our obligations as Americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. We will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. Some may still deny the overwhelming judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires, and crippling drought, and more powerful storms. The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition; we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries - we must claim its promise. That is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure - our forests and waterways; our croplands and snowcapped peaks. That is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by God. That's what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared.

We, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. Our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the flames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage. Our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. The knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. But we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well.

We will defend our people and uphold our values through strength of arms and rule of law. We will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully - not because we are naïve about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. America will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe; and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crisis abroad, for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. We will support democracy from Asia to Africa; from the Americas to the Middle East, because our interests and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom. And we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice - not out of mere charity, but because peace in our time requires the constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes: tolerance and opportunity; human dignity and justice.

We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths - that all of us are created equal - is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall; just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone; to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth.

It is now our generation's task to carry on what those pioneers began. For our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law - for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity; until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for, and cherished, and always safe from harm.

That is our generation's task - to make these words, these rights, these values - of Life, and Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness - real for every American. Being true to our founding documents does not require us to agree on every contour of life; it does not mean we will all define liberty in exactly the same way, or follow the same precise path to happiness. Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time - but it does require us to act in our time.

For now decisions are upon us, and we cannot afford delay. We cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or substitute spectacle for politics, or treat name-calling as reasoned debate. We must act, knowing that our work will be imperfect. We must act, knowing that today's victories will be only partial, and that it will be up to those who stand here in four years, and forty years, and four hundred years hence to advance the timeless spirit once conferred to us in a spare Philadelphia hall.

My fellow Americans, the oath I have sworn before you today, like the one recited by others who serve in this Capitol, was an oath to God and country, not party or faction - and we must faithfully execute that pledge during the duration of our service. But the words I spoke today are not so different from the oath that is taken each time a soldier signs up for duty, or an immigrant realizes her dream. My oath is not so different from the pledge we all make to the flag that waves above and that fills our hearts with pride.

They are the words of citizens, and they represent our greatest hope.

You and I, as citizens, have the power to set this country's course.

You and I, as citizens, have the obligation to shape the debates of our time - not only with the votes we cast, but with the voices we lift in defense of our most ancient values and enduring ideals.

Let each of us now embrace, with solemn duty and awesome joy, what is our lasting birthright. With common effort and common purpose, with passion and dedication, let us answer the call of history, and carry into an uncertain future that precious light of freedom.

Thank you, God Bless you, and may He forever bless these United States of America.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Lupe Fiasco Kicked Offstage For Anti-Obama Song]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 09:08:44 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/lupe+fiasco+new.jpg

Chicago rapper Lupe Fiasco caused a stir at a private inaugural event by busting out a song critical of President Obama.

At the StartUp RockOn concert, Lupe performed his song, “Words I Never Said,” which includes these lyrics:
 
“Limbaugh is a racist, Glenn Beck is a racist. Gaza Strip was getting bombed, Obama didn’t say s---. That’s why I ain’t vote for him, next one, either. I’m part of the problem, my problem is I’m peaceful.”
 
Lupe, an outspoken critic of Obama who once called the president “the biggest terrorist,” was escorted offstage by security guards. A few fans shouted, “Lupe!” but most booed. 
 
Lupe has also been acting erratically in Chicago lately. After getting into a Twitter beef with Chief Keef, he threatened to quit the music business. And last week, he announced he’d scrapped plans to release a follow-up to his popular "Food & Liquor" album.
 
Hypervocal, one of the party’s sponsors, Tweeted after the show that it was “Disappointed that an artist took opportunity to use an event celebrating innovation/startups to make a political statement.” 
 
I’m sure Hypervocal would not have been disappointed if Lupe had made a political statement by singing Obama’s praises. But they should have known who they were hiring before they invited him to the party. I’m sure they thought Chicago + rapper=Obama fan. That may be the case with Common, Rhymefest, Twista and Kid Sister, but it’s not the case with Lupe.
 

]]>
<![CDATA[Inauguration Around the Web: Cake, Blood and Typos]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 08:56:19 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/219*120/inaug_Monday_P14.jpg

President Barack Obama's second inauguration takes place today, and there's a lot going on. Some highlights from around the web: 

  • Though enthusiasm is more subdued that at Obama's first inaugurationl, there is one guy who wanted so badly to witness history that he's been selling his blood to pay for his trip to D.C., CNN reports
  • The first piece of cake eaten by Obama during his second term will no doubt have been baked by former "Ace of Cakes" star Duff Goldman, and served at the Commander in Chief's Ball. Dessert will be about four feet high, weigh 50 pounds and "glitter is going to be all over the place," Fox News says.
  • And this is your last chance to learn how to spell inaugration inaguration "inauguration," a word that has vexed hundreds of Twitterers and reporters over the past month, ABC says.

 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Larry Gerston on Obama's Place in History]]> Sun, 20 Jan 2013 11:09:51 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/WEBSunday7AM12013LarryGerston1_8188987_722x406_15118915872.jpg NBC Bay Area Political Analyst Larry Gerston is live in Washington, D.C. where President Barack Obama was sworn into office Sunday morning. He discusses Biden's future, the turnout, the pageantry, and Obama's place in history--as well as some quick 49ers talk.]]> <![CDATA[President Obama: "Our Journey Is Not Complete"]]> Wed, 12 Feb 2014 11:24:33 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/obama_inaugural_Mon_P21.jpg

President Barack Obama outlined a broad sweep of second-term goals, from gun control to climate change to revamping the tax code, in a second inaugural address Monday that invoked the country's long battle over civil rights and signaled his commitment to core progressive causes.

In the signature moment of a day of pomp and tradition, Obama spoke to hundreds of thousands of people gathered in front of the U.S. Capitol, using the refrain “our journey is not complete” to draw lines from the work of the founding fathers and Martin Luther King Jr. to contemporary battles over gay marriage, immigration rights, voting laws and fair pay for women.

"That is our generation's task: to make these words, these rights, these values — of life, and liberty, and the pursuit of happiness — real for every American," Obama said.

Read: President Obama's inaugural address.

He didn't get into details about his policy objectives, mostly relying on rhetorical flourishes aimed at inspiring a country still mired in the economic doldrums and suffering from a deep political divide. Obama is expected to offer more specifics in his State of the Union address on Feb. 12.

Obama echoed several themes he made during his re-election campaign last fall, which ended with a resounding victory and a recharging of his political momentum. He stressed the importance of government's role in an economic recovery, promised to defend entitlement programs like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, called for greater reliance on sustainable energy sources, promised an emphasis on diplomatic engagement with foreign enemies and called for a withdrawal from "perpetual war."

By bringing up gay marriage, climate change and strengthening the government's safety net, Obama indicated that he would pursue a left-leaning agenda for the next four years.

"Our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it," the president said.

Read: Richard Blanco's inaugural poem.

The inauguration took place on a national holiday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The timing represented a unique opportunity for Obama, who is still negotiating his role as a "post-racial" black leader, to show African-Americans that he remains focused on issues of inequality.

The first black president paraphrased King's "I Have a Dream" speech, which was delivered nearly 50 years ago across the National Mall at the Lincoln Memorial. He also mentioned touchstones of the women's rights and gay rights movements.

"We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still," Obama said. "Just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall; just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great Mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone; to hear a King proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on Earth."

For full politics coverage, visit NBCNews.com.

With the speech, Obama set out on his second term as a battle-tested but emboldened leader who is still chasing the grand vision he laid out four years ago, when he promised to lead an anxious nation on a path to greater hope, unity and prosperity.

This time around, the Inauguration Day festivities, and the country's expectations, were more modest, with about half as many people expected to converge on the National Mall and Obama working to fulfill his original promise.

But Obama seemed invigorated by the prospect of another four years to accomplish what he hadn't in his first term. There was a bit of defiance, too, as when he took thinly veiled swipes at Republican critics, including his former campaign opponent Mitt Romney, who've accused him of forcing more government into people's everyday lives.

Government safety-net programs "do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great," Obama said.

He referenced the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and the leaders of the Civil Rights era, to make the argument that America can never reach its full potential if it abandons the notion of equality for all.

"It is now our generation's task to carry on what those pioneers began," Obama said. "For our journey is not complete until our wives, our mothers, and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law - for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. Our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity; until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for, and cherished, and always safe from harm."

The speech followed Obama's ceremonial oath of office, administered by Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. Obama took the oath with his left hand on two Bibles, one used by Abraham Lincoln and the other by King.


Officially, Obama started his second term on Sunday, when he took the formal oath of office in a private ceremony in the East Room of the White House. That twist was due to the fact that the Constitution mandates presidential terms begin Jan. 20. Custom holds that when that date falls on a Sunday, public inauguration events are held the next day.

As the capital filled with people on Monday morning, Obama started his day with his family and Vice President Joe Biden at St. John's Episcopal Church, a few blocks from the White House.

During his arrival at church and his departure, cheers erupted from people on the streets, and it continued as Obama returned in his motorcade to the White House for a pre-oath coffee with Congressional leaders.

Only two of four living former presidents made the trip to the Capitol Monday. Bill Clinton showed up with his wife, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. So did Jimmy Carter. Obama’s predecessor, George W. Bush, stayed behind to look after his father, George H.W. Bush, who is recovering from an illness.

As in 2009, Monday's festivities had a Hollywood feel. Beyoncé, who sang the National Anthem, and her husband, rapper Jay-Z, chatted with Rev. Al Sharpton before the ceremony started. Actress Eva Longoria was seated on the platform outside the Capitol, not far from singers Katy Perry and John Mayer. The program included performances from musicians Kelly Clarkson and James Taylor. Also spotted in the crowd was former Boston Celtics great Bill Russell.

The crowd for the country's 57th presidential inauguration was expected to reach about a half-million people, an impressive size but considerably smaller than the 1.8 million who showed up to witness the arrival of America's first black president in 2009. Security remained just as tight as it was then, although authorities say there are no credible threats of any attack, terrorist or otherwise.

Obama clearly meant his speech as a pep talk to a country that is in need of one.

Most Americans remain worried about the economy and see tough times ahead, polls show. And although Obama remains a popular and in many ways transcendent leader, they don't think he's achieved many of the lofty goals he set out for himself in his 2009 inauguration, namely rising above the partisan fray, reversing America's fiscal woes and pulling troops out of Afghanistan.

Spurred by the schoolhouse massacre in Newtown, Conn., Obama has put gun control at the top of his agenda, along with reforming immigration and tax laws and taking on climate change. He is also about to begin another battle with Congress over the debt limit and automatic spending cuts.

"Progress does not compel us to settle centuries-long debates about the role of government for all time," Obama said. "But it does require us to act in our time."

Later in the afternoon, after an inaugural luncheon event with Congressional leaders in the Capitol building, Obama and Biden appeared outside with their wives and stood with their hands over their hearts as a procession of military color guards passed.

They then got into a bulletproof Cadillac limousine known as “The Beast” and headed to front of the inauguration parade, making the 1.2 mile trip from the Capitol to the White House at a snail’s pace to allow the public a good look – albeit from behind a thick cordon of active and reserve troops, federal agents and state and local police.

About halfway through the route, outside the FBI headquarters, Obama and the first lady got out of the limo, locked hands and walked down Pennsylvania Avenue, waving to the thousands of people who lined the street.

They emerged again near the route’s end, strolling together toward the White House gates. Later, joined by their two daughters, climbed into the presidential view stand to watch the remainder of the parade.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[List of Inaugural Parade Participants]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 14:04:33 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/180*120/InauguralParadeIllinoisFloat.jpg

The Inaugural Parade will feature floats and bands that honor the backgrounds of the First and Second Families, as well as presentations that honor the Inaugural theme, "Our People, Our Future."

Several of the parade participants come from around the District. The Ballou Senior High School "Majestic" Marching Knights will represent Washington; the University of Maryland Marching Band will be there from College Park.

The 54th Mass Volunteer Infantry Regiment Company B comes from Silver Spring, while Canine Companions for Independence comes from Fauquier County, Va. And, of course, the Virginia Military Institute Marching Band and Unit will represent Lexington, Va.

Visitors got a sneak peek at the floats Sunday in the staging area.

Here's the full list of the parade participants, in the order they will march:

The Presidential Escort

The Presidential Escort is a military and civilian formation that escorts the President, Vice President, and their families from the Capitol to the White House following the swearing-in ceremony. The escort will include representatives from the five branches of the United States Military, elected officials, and local and national law enforcement organizations.

Division One

  • United States Army Staff
  • United States Army Field Band
  • United States Military Academy
  • United States Army 1st Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment
  • United States Army Color Guard
  • District of Columbia Army National Guard
  • United States Army Reserve 200th MP Command
  • Punahou High School Marching Band and JROTC Color Guard, Hawaii
  • Hawaii Home State Float
  • Isiserettes Drill & Drum Corps, Iowa
  • Caisson Platoon, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment
  • Miami University Marching Band, Ohio
  • Illinois Home State Float
  • South Shore Drill Team, Illinois
  • Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission, South Carolina
  • Kamehameha Schools “Warrior” Marching Band, Hawaii
  • Ambulance 255 Project, Connecticut
  • 81st Regional Support Command Wildcats, South Carolina
  • Jackson Memorial High School “Jaguar” Band, New Jersey
  • Seguro Que Si, Florida
  • Kansas University Trumpet Ensemble, Kansas

Division Two

  • United States Marine Corps Staff
  • United States Marine Band “The President’s Own”
  • United States Marine Corps Active Company
  • United States Marine Corps Color Guard
  • United States Marine Corps Reserve Company
  • Chinese American Community Center Folk Dance Troupe, Delaware
  • Delaware Home State Float
  • University of Maryland “Mighty Sound of Maryland” Marching Band, Maryland
  • Pennsylvania Home State Float
  • Boy Scout Troop 358, Germantown, Pennsylvania
  • Palm Springs High School "Spirit of the Sands" Marching Band and Visual Corps, California
  • Ballet Folklórico De La Raza, Colorado
  • 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company A, Massachusetts
  • Utuqqagmiut Dancers, Alaska
  • A Therapeutic Equine Assisted Self-Confidence Experience (A.T.E.A.S.E.), Wisconsin
  • Palmview High School Mariachi and Folkloric Group, Texas
  • NASA - Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Curiosity Rover
  • Dobyns-Bennett High School Band, Tennessee
  • 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company B, Maryland
  • Boston College “Screaming Eagles” Marching Band, Massachusetts

Division Three

  • United States Navy Staff
  • United States Navy Band
  • United States Naval Academy
  • United States Navy Active Company
  • United States Navy Color Guard
  • United States Navy Reserve Company
  • Georgia State University Marching Band, Georgia
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Float
  • Ballou Senior High School "Majestic" Marching Knights, District of Columbia
  • Multi-Jurisdictional Mounted Police Drill Team and Color Guard, Michigan
  • Calera High School “Eagle” Marching Band, Alabama
  • Gym Dandies Children’s Circus, Maine
  • Boston Crusaders Drum & Bugle Corps, Massachusetts
  • Civil Rights Float
  • Lesbian and Gay Band Association
  • Native American Women Warriors, Colorado
  • Little Rock Central High School Band, Arkansas
  • Utah Hispanic Dance Alliance, Utah
  • Central Valley High School Marching Band and Color Guard, Washington

Division Four

  • United States Air Force Staff
  • United States Air Force Band
  • United States Air Force Academy
  • United States Air Force Active Company
  • United States Air Force Color Guard
  • District of Columbia Air National Guard
  • United States Air Force Reserve Company
  • Grambling State University “Tiger” Marching Band, Louisiana
  • Tuskegee Airmen Float
  • Norwich University Regimental Band, Vermont
  • Montana Delegation, Montana
  • Wind River Dancers, Wyoming
  • Canine Companions for Independence
  • Navajo Nation Band, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico
  • United War Veterans Council, New York
  • Pearl River Community College Marching Band, Mississippi
  • Union High School Air Force JROTC, Oklahoma
  • Fergus Falls High School Marching Band, Minnesota
  • Northwest Dragon and Lion Dance Team, Oregon
  • Asheville High School Marching Band, North Carolina

Division Five

  • United States Coast Guard Staff
  • United States Coast Guard Band
  • United States Coast Guard Academy
  • United States Coast Guard Active Component
  • United States Coast Guard Color Guard
  • United States Coast Guard Reserve Component
  • United States Merchant Marine Academy Staff
  • United States Merchant Marine Academy Band
  • United States Merchant Marine Academy Color Guard
  • United States Merchant Marine Academy Company
  • Northern State University “Marching Wolves,” South Dakota
  • Military Spouses of Michigan, Michigan
  • Londonderry High School Marching Band and Color Guard, New Hampshire
  • Culver Academies, Indiana
  • Portsmouth High School “Patriots” Marching Band, Rhode Island
  • The Native American Tribes of North Dakota, North Dakota
  • Liberty North High School Band, Missouri
  • Sarpy County Nebraska Metro Area Law Enforcement Honor Guard, Nebraska
  • Frankfort High School Marching Band, West Virginia
  • Comparza Morelense, Nevada
  • Letcher County Central High School Marching Band, Kentucky
  • Our People, Our Future Float & Citizen Co-Chairs
  • Firefighters of Idaho, Idaho
  • Virginia Military Institute, Virginia
]]>
<![CDATA[Ms. Curiosity Goes to Washington for Inaugural Parade]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 11:17:08 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/rover-mars-eye-1.jpg

The team of scientists that guided NASA's Curiosity to Mars last summer will accompany a model of the rover -- dubbed Ms. Curiosity -- during Monday's inauguration parade in Washington D.C.

The life-size model will roll along the parade route alongside Jet Propulsion Laboratory project manager Richard Cook, flight director Bobak Ferdowsi, mission manager Jennifer Trosper and deputy project scientist Ashwin Vasavada. Program executive Dave Lavery and program scientist Michael Meyer, both of NASA headquarters, will march with the team.

NASA will have two floats in the inauguration parade, scheduled to begin at about 11:30 a.m. PT. A model of rover Orion, a capsule designed to transport astronauts deep into space, will be part of the event.

Current and former astronauts also will march in the parade.

Curiosity is part of an effort to determine whether environmental conditions on Mars could have been favorable to microbes. The journey to the drilling spot should take about two weeks.

The SUV-sized rover landed on Mars Aug. 6.

]]>
<![CDATA[Michelle Obama: America's First Lady of Fashion]]> Fri, 25 Jan 2013 05:22:43 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/den-night-add-tue-P4.jpg

When Michelle Obama stepped out beside her husband on Inauguration Day, all eyes — at first — were on what she was wearing. 

Her outfit for the occasion: A navy dress and coat ensemble by designer Thom Browne, in a fabric based on the style of a silk necktie. A necklace by designer Cathy Waterman and a belt and shoes by J.Crew. Ahead of the big event, Obama made headlines for the new bangs she debuted.

The White House also revealed the Obama daughters' outfits: Malia wore a J. Crew ensemble and Sasha a Kate Spade coat and dress.

Monday marked the start of a new term for President Barack Obama — and another four years of fashion influence and scrutiny for Michelle Obama. And if a look back at the first lady's style choices during her husband's first term is any indication, she’s totally fine with both.

"What has become part of the first lady's job is to act as a champion of American fashion," says Kathleen Graddy, curator of the First Ladies Collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, where Michelle Obama's Jason Wu gown from her husband's 2009 inauguration is now a permanent fixture. Following the second inauguration, Obama's outfit and accompanying accessories will be placed with the National Archives, NBC News reported. 

"Michelle Obama does a laudable job of showcasing a variety of different designers. It's certainly a place where the nation, and the world, gets to see the work of our designers and the fashion industry," Graddy said.

Unlike her predecessors, Mrs. Obama has not just showcased homegrown talent but has also fundamentally changed the way Americans view the nation’s first wardrobe.

"More than anything else, she broke that first lady uniform that we had gotten so used to seeing," In Style editor-at-large Hal Rubenstein says.

"How a first lady dressed – an image that was basically fostered by Nancy Reagan, and you can even add Hillary Clinton to that, where you wore this tasteful wool bouclé suit or dressed in a gown – was elegant and modest. There was never a hint of sex appeal anywhere," he noted.

But Michelle Obama’s fashion hallmarks — exposed arms, cinched waists, a mix of high-end (Azzedine Alaïa, Alexander McQueen) and mass-market (J.Crew, Target) brands and tailoring that highlights rather than hides her curves — have split from that tradition and made her one of the most watched women in the world.

"Look at all the White House first lady portraits. They are all wearing that suit. The first official portrait of Michelle Obama was in a black, sleeveless Michael Kors sheath, and the reaction was, 'Oh, look, here’s a modern American woman.' Here’s a woman who the cool women who work in New York or Los Angeles – or anywhere for that matter – would like to be represented by," Rubenstein added.

"In terms of her regular workday wardrobe, an American woman can look at that and think, 'I’d love to buy a dress like that,' or 'I’d love to try a shape like that,' instead of looking at a first lady and thinking ‘Oh, that’s her uniform.’”

J.Crew creative director Jenna Lyons has a similar view.

"There are very few people that hold the country's attention the way she does. I don't think anyone ever noticed what Hillary Clinton wore, or necessarily cared," Lyons told Style.com in 2010.

"I love that [Michelle Obama] wore an Alaïa dress with a J.Crew cardigan and Jimmy Choo shoes. And she shops her closet. I'll notice sometimes she’s worn something of ours and then it’ll be altered — she’s actually had it changed, which I think is kind of amazing — and she’ll wear it completely differently. It says a lot about what works today," she said.

Sartorial missteps have been few and far between in Mrs. Obama’s many public appearances, but her decision to sport $500 Lanvin sneakers at an anti-poverty event in a food bank certainly raised eyebrows. So did the cardigan, top and skirt she wore to a meeting with Queen Elizabeth II, an ensemble many deemed too casual for such an occasion.

It’s a conundrum all first ladies face: how to be true to their own sense of style while operating within the confines of public and political expectations.

"First ladies prefer to concentrate on their work rather than on their wardrobe," Smithsonian curator Graddy said. "They are happy to supply that information [about which designers created their outfits], and they want to look appropriate — that’s part of their job, too — but they don’t want it to be the primary focus of their job."

For Michelle Obama, her wardrobe can aid in her work.

During her husband's presidency, she has drawn attention to childhood obesity and placed healthy eating habits firmly at the forefront of her public agenda. That she unapologetically looks great, and like she enjoys fashion, makes her more relatable to the average American and helps her message to stick.

"She didn’t move to Washington and become part of this paradigm of how Washington people should dress. You see her out on the lawn with her kids, or she’s coming to visit schools, and she is wearing a twin set or a J.Crew top — or she goes on 'The View' in a dress that she bought at Target," In Style's Rubenstein added.

The fact that the first lady doesn't favor a particular brand, designer or price point has boosted her appeal and sent a helpful message to American women, too, said Rubenstein.

It has also boosted the fortunes of the American fashion industry.

In a 2010 study of her economic impact, David Yermack of the New York University's Stern School looked at 29 clothing companies whose garments Michelle Obama wore in 189 public appearances between November 2008 and December 2009. His study found that a brand's stock price typically jumped by 2 to 3 percent after she wore its label — and that the overall value to a company of Mrs. Obama making an appearance in its brand could reach $14 million.

Designer Naeem Khan discovered first-hand just how influential Mrs. Obama can be when she wore one of his outfits to a state dinner in February 2009. These days, a quick glance at the many actresses who wore his gowns to the Golden Globe Awards this month is testament to the first lady's influence.

"My stuff is flying out of stores," Khan told The Wall Street Journal in 2010. "It's the gift that doesn't stop giving."

So what might the first lady wear in her husband's second term?

It’s unlikely we’ll witness a major change in her style, despite her new hairstyle. Rather than make radical wardrobe turnabouts, she focuses on a few surefire silhouettes and experiments with color, designers and accessories.

Rubenstein explained her style: "Very tailored clothes. You’ll never see her wear a skirt that is too short. She likes to show her waist. She tends toward florals, and she likes strong colors without being neon. She rarely, if ever, wears stripes. She likes to show off her arms. She doesn't wear a plunging neckline or a backless dress, because that would get her in too much trouble."

As for her inauguration wardrobe? Until Monday morning, that was anybody’s guess — and that’s just how her fashion followers wanted it.

 


 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[David Gregory Previews Obama's Second Term]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 08:14:38 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/214*120/inaug_Monday_P4.jpg "Meet the Press" moderator David Gregory joined NBC Washington's Angie Goff and Richard Jordan to discuss the issues that will likely define President Obama's second term.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Valerie Jarrett Discusses Opportunities for Obama's Second Term]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 05:35:08 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Valerie+Jarrett1.jpg President Barack Obama's senior advisor Valerie Jarrett talks about the benefit of having four years under the belt moving forward into a second term. Mary Ann Ahern reports for NBC News on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013.]]> <![CDATA[Live Coverage: The Social Inauguration]]> Sun, 20 Jan 2013 12:42:06 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/20130119UGCSolicit.jpg

Sneak a peek behind the scenes of President Obama's second inauguration. We're live blogging the inauguration, curating the top tweets, Facebook posts, Instagram photos and more from NBC journalists on the ground in Washington and social media users around the country.

Using Storify, this social experience will be updated in real-time to tell the story of the inauguration through social media.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[President Obama's Second Term Agenda]]> Sun, 20 Jan 2013 11:08:41 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/inaugu973764.jpg NBC Bay Area Political Analyst Larry Gerston is live in Washington, D.C. where President Barack Obama was sworn into office Sunday morning at the presidential inauguration. He discusses President Obama's second-term agenda, which includes an assault weapons ban, immigration reform, and the debt ceiling--and he even shows his 49ers colors.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Ms. Curiosity Goes to Washington for Parade]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 14:05:51 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/rover-mars-eye-1.jpg

The Southern California team of scientists that guided Curiosity to Mars last summer accompanied a replica of the rover during Monday's inauguration parade in Washington D.C.

The life-size model -- referred to as Ms. Curiosity -- was scheduled to roll along the parade route alongside Jet Propulsion Laboratory project manager Richard Cook, flight director Bobak Ferdowsi, mission manager Jennifer Trosper and deputy project scientist Ashwin Vasavada. Program executive Dave Lavery and program scientist Michael Meyer, both of NASA headquarters, will march with the team.

The rovers are considered ships of exploration, so all are referred to in the feminine.

NASA has two floats in the inauguration parade. A model of rover Orion, a capsule designed to transport astronauts deep into space, will be part of the event.

Current and former astronauts also were invited to march in the parade.

Curiosity -- currently blasting rocks at exploring the Martian surface -- is part of an effort to determine whether environmental conditions on Mars could have been favorable to microbes. The journey to the drilling spot should take about two weeks.

The SUV-sized rover landed on Mars Aug. 6.

More Local Stories:

]]>
<![CDATA[National Day of Service]]> Sat, 19 Jan 2013 14:51:49 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/edt-thumb-AP178053833537_1.jpg On the cusp of both the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and President Obama's second inauguration, Americans across the country come together to serve their neighbors and communities in a national Day of Service.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Presidential Inaugurations Old Hat for SF Man]]> Thu, 17 Jan 2013 11:59:28 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/160*120/houskeeper.JPG

Aside from the minor detail of being voted leader of the United States, Presidents Obama, Carter, Reagan, Clinton and Nixon all have something in common: Lee Houskeeper was on hand to watch their swearing-ins.

While the presidents likely weren't apprised of this precious detail, Houskeeper, a well-known San Francisco press agent, is quite proud of the fact. "It's the experience of being there," he said.

"It reaffirms the democracy and the participation and the citizens' participation in our freedoms," he said.

Houskeeper didn't entertain as lofty democratic ideals when he attended his first inauguration.

In 1968, Houskeeper was hanging out in New York's Greenwich Village when a young woman invited him to ride a bus to Washington, D.C., to protest President Richard Nixon's swearing-in. "On the way to Washington I'm sitting between two guys with helmets and gas masks," Houskeeper recalled.

Upon arriving in Washington, Houskeeper quickly ditched his protesting hosts and instead stumbled into numerous parties thrown by Congress members. "So I discovered a taste for inaugurals in 1968," he said with a crooked smile.

Since that experience, Houskeeper has attended nearly every presidential inauguration — save for Presidents Bush Sr. and Jr. He didn't care much for their politics.

He ended up helping organize a last-minute party for President Jimmy's Carter's inauguration, which gave him the leverage to invite his mom.

"The president came through, and so that was very memorable to take your mom to an inaugural ball," he said.

He attended President Ronald Reagan's inaugural ball, thanks to some well-placed connections who gave him tickets.

He said President Bill Clinton's inauguration was quite a bash. "We really felt Clinton was going to change the world," Houskeeper said. "And that was some party."

But his favorite by far, was four years ago when he attended President Barack Obama's first swearing-in... sort of. Because of a ticket snafu, he couldn't get into the actual event. So he watched it happily on a TV back at his hotel.

"It's the experience of being there, "Houskeeper said, flipping through his souvenir Obama inaugural invitation. "It's just being part of it."

This weekend, Houskeeper will join many West Coasters heading east to Washington for Obama's second swearing-in on Monday. 

He loaded up on long underwear and earmuffs for the expected cold weather. "I remember long underwear with the flaps and stuff," Houskeeper said, looking over his recent purchase.

"This stuff is like pantyhose."

This time around, Houskeeper will attend the inauguration in style. He has eight tickets to the swearing-in and invitations to numerous parties. He's most excited the chance to take his son along for the first time for a graceful introduction to democracy's supreme event — minus the gasmasks and helmets.



Photo Credit: Joe Rosato Jr.]]>
<![CDATA[Authorities Vigilant for Inauguration]]> Sat, 19 Jan 2013 11:23:47 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/security.jpg

President Barack Obama's 2009 inauguration was, from a security standpoint, about as hairy as it gets: the most important people in American government, from the commander-in-chief to the Supreme Court, assembled outside the Capitol, surrounded by nearly two million people at a time of heightened terror risk.

The circumstances make Obama's second inauguration, to take place Jan. 21 with about half the attendance and fewer parties, seem sort of quaint in comparison.

But authorities aren't any less tense. The Secret Service, FBI, armed forces, Metropolitan Police Department, Capitol Police, U.S. Park Police and an array of local law enforcement agencies began planning for the event long before Obama's re-election. They're being just as meticulous as they were four years ago -- perhaps even more so.

"You don't want to be the person who makes a decision…to cut back and something happens. That's a legacy you don't want," said Joseph Funk, a retired Secret Service agent who protected two presidents and ran the agency's Washington D.C. office. "So you will not see anything different this year."

Thousands of troops, agents and cops will be in the streets, trying to manage crowds and eying potential threats. There will be sharpshooters on rooftops, undercover investigators among the spectators and analysts poring over surveillance images. There will be airport-style magnetometers, high-tech bomb-detecting equipment and armored "tactical vehicles." There will be roadside checkpoints and dozens of closed streets and tunnels. Parking will be a nightmare.

Washington D.C. estimates that between 600,000 and 800,000 will gather on the National Mall and along the inauguration parade route. That's a considerably smaller number than in 2009, but "still a big crowd," said Christopher Geldart, director of the city's Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency.

The city, which has been planning since June, is borrowing 3,200 National Guard troops, and another 500 or so police officers from other local departments, for help with traffic control and other logistical duties, Geldart said.

While the crowd-management concerns won't be quite as acute as four years ago, Geldart pointed out that there are other areas that have drawn more attention, in part because of breakdowns at the 2009 inauguration. Although the celebration ended with no arrests, there were some relatively minor snafus: hundreds of ticket holders were misdirected into the Third Street Tunnel and remained stuck there for hours, and poorly designed signs and understaffed entrances led to interminable lines.

This time, authorities are bringing in temporary cell phone towers to make sure they can better communicate with each other. Officials will be monitoring Twitter, Facebook and other social media sites to get a better idea of where people are massing and if there are problems. There will be clearer directions for visitors; Geldart encouraged out-of-towners to check out the city's inauguration website.

Organizers say that people who enter secured areas should expect the same level of security that they see from the TSA at the airport.

Washington D.C. police chief Cathy Lanier said her entire 3,900-member force will be working the inauguration. They've gone over the security plan to the point of obsessiveness, and technology has been a huge help. Instead of lugging around 200-page manuals as in prior years, each of her commanders now carries it in a digital tablet, with the ability to make last-minute changes, share observations and monitor surveillance video and social media sites.

"This is the third inauguration I've had direct planning over, and this is one of the best plans I've seen," Lanier said. "I feel real comfortable with it."

In 2009, intelligence officials heard reports that Somalia-based Islamic militants were planning some type of attack on Obama's inauguration, and Osama bin Laden warned that the new president would inherit a fight against guerrilla warfare. There were also lingering concerns from the November 2008 terror attacks in Mumbai, India. And there were some threats posted on white supremacist message boards that appeared credible.

There has been no credible threat so far this year, said Debra Smith, acting assistant director in charge of the Washington field office of the FBI.

As was the case in 2009, the Department of Homeland Security has declared the inauguration a National Special Security Event, meaning that the lead agency is the Secret Service, with the FBI taking over investigative duties in case of an attack or other disaster.

The Secret Service declined to answer questions about its preparations.

"Although we cannot discuss our means, methods, specific resources or numbers we utilize to carry out our protective responsibilities, we can say there is a tremendous amount of advance planning and coordination," spokesman Brian Leary said in a statement.

No matter how good the intelligence, and how extensive the planning, there's always a bit of anxiety gnawing at you, former security officials said.

Retired Army Major Gen. Richard Rowe, who headed a military task force in charge of the capital region during the 2009 inauguration, said he didn't think the risk of an attack had diminished.

"I have trouble imagining that anyone thinks the threat here is any less, because of the types of things that could happen," Rowe said. "If anything, there probably more technological capabilities out there that could be applied."

But the inauguration is the Secret Service' equivalent of the Super Bowl, and the agency never really stops thinking about it.

"I don't think people have a true understanding of the enormity of it," Funk said. "It's hard to equate it with anything else. It would be New Year's Eve in Times Square times ten in terms of the security that goes into it."

He added: "This is the pinnacle of what we do."

Chris Gordon contributed reporting.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Obama Starts New Term With Eye on History]]> Mon, 21 Jan 2013 07:36:47 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/AP357696253168.jpg

President Barack Obama began his second term on Sunday, emboldened by his renewed political capital but still chasing the grand vision he laid out four years ago, when he promised to lead a battered nation on a path to greater hope, unity and prosperity.

The next step in that journey comes at noon Monday, when Obama will stand outside the Capitol, place his left hand on Bibles used by Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King Jr. and take the ceremonial oath of office. He kicked off the historic day by visiting St. John's Episcopal Church with his family. Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden also entered the Washington church early Monday morning for mass.

Obama took the official oath of office at 11:55 a.m. Sunday in a private ceremony in the East Room of the White House. That's because Jan. 20, the first day of the presidential term mandated by the Constitution, falls on a Sunday.

For full politics coverage, visit NBCNews.com.

Just a handful of people attended Sunday's ceremony -- including daughter Sasha, who greeted Obama after he took the oath by saying, 'You didn't mess up" --  but more than a half-million people will pack into the National Mall on Monday to cheer him on. It will be an impressive crowd but considerably smaller than the 1.8 million who showed up to witness the inauguration of America's first black president in 2009. Security will be just as tight as it was then, although authorities say there are no credible threats of any attack, terrorist or otherwise.

Obama, still riding his dominant re-election performance and a triumph in the fiscal cliff showdown, will then deliver an inaugural address to a country in need of a good pep talk.

Most Americans remain worried about the economy and see tough times ahead, polls show. And although Obama remains a popular and in many ways transcendent leader, they don't think he's achieved many of the lofty goals he set out for himself in his 2009 inauguration, namely rising above the partisan fray, reversing America's fiscal woes and pulling troops out of Afghanistan.

Obama is expected to address those challenges and remind the country of his most impressive victories, including health care reform, the killing of Osama bin Laden and the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell, while sketching his plans for his remaining time in office.

Spurred by the schoolhouse massacre in Newtown, Conn., Obama has put gun control at the top of his agenda, along with reforming immigration and tax laws and taking on climate change. He may choose not to delve into specifics of these plans on Monday, and instead save the details for his State of the Union speech Feb. 12. By then he could very well be engaged in a battle with Congress over the debt limit and automatic spending cuts.

Obama might also make reference to the fact that his second inauguration falls on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, nearly 50 years after the civil rights leader delivered his "I Have A Dream" speech across the mall at the Lincoln Memorial. It would be a reminder that the president is still negotiating his role as a "post-racial" black leader, even as he tries to show African Americans that he remains focused on issues of inequality.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Barbara Perry, a presidential scholar at the University of Virginia's Miller Center, likened a second inauguration to a couple renewing their wedding vows. "They've had all the fights, they know all the strengths and weaknesses, but they try to fall in love again," Perry said. "After his re-election, the American people want to fall in love with Barack Obama again."

Will Obama aim to make his second term about building an ideological legacy? He is already a transformative president, by virtue of who he is, and what he represents. So he will likely approach the next four years as more of a pragmatist, using his talents as a strategist and tactician to secure meaningful but measured advances from a combative Congress, analysts say.

"Obama has four years of job training under his belt. He has a better sense of what's possible and what's not," Perry said.

In 2009, "he believed more in the hope and change business, and he probably thought he could be more of a change agent in that realm…But I think he's learning how to deal with Congress and in the last few weeks he does seem more aggressive in putting forward new policies, such as gun control."

History is lined with second-term presidents who overestimated their political capital and stumbled, or lost focus and allowed stasis or scandal to set in. Obama, the 20th president—and the third in a row—to serve all or part of a second term, hopes to strike a balance between boldness and prudence.

He'll be working against the clock. Historians warn of a turning point somewhere at the two-year mark where allies and enemies alike begin to think of the next election, and a sitting president's influence begins to wane.

At his first inauguration, with the country reeling from a near-economic meltdown and "a sapping of confidence across our land," Obama told Americans they had "chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord." He called for "a new era of responsibility."

That goal remains a work in progress.

About a third of Americans think the nation is headed in the right direction, and nearly three-quarters don't like where the economy is headed. Democratic pollster Peter Hart told NBC News last week that the results of his latest survey showed that "if 2009 was all about hope, 2013 is about the ability to cope."

But Obama still has a way of inspiring positive vibes. Most Americans say they like him and that he has been a good president.

For his second term, he'll need to draw on that source of goodwill. 

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Bay Area Residents Prepare for Trip to Obama Inauguration]]> Fri, 18 Jan 2013 09:31:42 -0700 http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Obama-Gun-Measures-Crop.jpg

Some Bay Area residents are taking off on a trip of a lifetime. They have tickets to President Barack Obama's inauguration in Washington D.C. on Monday.

Twenty-year-old Abdul Banafa of Milpitas won a pair of tickets on Congressman Mike Honda's facebook page.

"It's gonna be amazing especially since it's the first time I voted for him," Banafa said.

Banafa will be doing more than taking pictures. He plans to network all he can with the nation's leaders, while looking for career opportunities.

"Right now the main plan is physical therapy but I was looking at internships in D.C. before this so this is my chance to talk to people," he said.

A group of teenagers from the peninsula are also heading east.

The Youth Video Corps in Palo Alto got tickets from Representative Anna Eshoo's office. The team produces videos about community issues.

Now it's taking the show on the road to cover the inauguration.

"Definitely a lifetime experience going to inauguration and seeing President and seeing how he's enjoying the moment," 15-year-old Nitya Kasturi said.

Follow NBC BAY AREA for the latest news, weather, and events: iPad App | iPhone App | Android App | Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | RSS | Text Alerts | Email Alerts



Photo Credit: AP]]>