Counter Intelligence: MJ's Pet Chimp Poised for Comeback

By Xana O'Neill
|  Monday, Jun 29, 2009  |  Updated 11:00 AM PDT
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Weird News Photos: Holiday Edition

Michael Jackson's adopted pet chimp Bubbles -- now 26-years old -- has reportedly found new fame in the wake of his former owner's death.

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See what happened to the King of Pop's sidekick and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

  • Michael Jackson's adopted pet chimp Bubbles -- now 26-years old -- has reportedly found new fame in the wake of his former owner's death. The chimp's new owner said the pet has had a recent flurry of publicity offers. Jackson, who was seemingly inseparable from the pet, adopted then 3-year old Bubbles from a cancer research center in Texas in 1985.
     
  • The cuteness factor has played a big role in determining which animals make it on the endangered species list. In the past few decades, so-called "glamour species" such as gray wolves, bald eagles and grizzly bears have made the cut. Now, the government is making a better effort to preserve the Arkansas fatmuckets of the animal kingdom as they attempt to re-embrace their original "Noah's Ark" mantra: Save everything.
     
  • Some scientists claim girls are hard-wired to play with Barbies. A new study shows genetic preference may reinforce gender stereotypes and that social conditioning may play a lesser role in gender development than previously thought. Research showed that boys between the ages of 3 and 8 months preferred to play with toy trucks and girls opted to play with dolls.
     
  • Rain water is now legal to collect in Colorado. Since its days as a territory, the state has had laws against collecting rainwater -- but the introduction of two new laws now make it legal. The change is primarily because of growing population, drought and groundwater drying up making rain harvesting a more attractive practice, something more Western states are trying to adopt.
     
  • Fatalistic teens are more likely to die young. Teenagers who think they're going to die young are more likely to create a self-fulfilling prophecy and engage in risky behavior that could contribute to the deaths, a new study shows. Research that tracked 20,000 kids in grades 7 through 12 found 15 percent of them thought they'd die before 35. Those who thought they'd die early were seven times more likely to get AIDS.

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