Nummi Workers Fear Detroit Fallout

Workers await to see future

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    Janna Dake, a Ford inspector for 20 years, works the final assembly line for the F-150 pickup.

    Workers at Nummi are worried about the potential fallout if the Detroit auto industry goes belly up.

    A lot of people at Nummi feel if the auto industry gets a bailout it could help save jobs not just here at the plant but throughout the community.

    "(I) worked here at Nummi, my father worked here at Nummi," Sergo Santos said. "It's provided a good life for myself and my father and grandfather."

    And Santos wants that to continue.

    But the third generation auto worker, and current local union president, worries the auto industry's troubles could mean tough times for workers at the Fremont auto plant.

    "They told us layoffs are not being considered at this time but it doesn't mean it can't happen," he said.

    The New United Motor Manufacturing Plant, or Nummi, which is owned jointly by Toyota and GM, has already announced its cutting one shift of Tacoma truck production in January.

    It's also stopping production for two days in December.

    Workers said they are hopeful Congress will approve an auto industry bailout that could help the Fremont plant keep its production lines running.

    "This is something our members aren't used to," Santos said.

    But the bailout plan faces serious roadblocks.

    Even Fremont Representative Pete Stark is speaking out against it.

    Stark blasted General Motors Tuesday saying, "The current management is arguably incompetent. They got GM where they are today. Why would you reward them?"

    Workers here say the slowdown the company's experiencing doesn't just affect the 5,000 people who work at the plant but hundreds of the company's suppliers.

    It's estimated the company has 1,000 suppliers that employ another 50,000 people.