Mom: Nanny Saved My Drowning Child

Doctors at San Diego's Rady Children's Hospital say 6 children nearly drown in separate incidents over last 48 hours

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Gabriel Clark's precious little life flashed before his nanny's eyes Monday - while they swam with his 4 year old sister in a neighbor's pool. NBC 7's Steven Luke reports. (Published Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014)

A 1-year-old who nearly drowned in his Bonsall neighbor’s backyard pool Monday was saved by the quick-thinking and training of his nanny, his mother said.

Karen Clark insists her nanny's knowledge of CPR saved her son Gabriel.

The toddler was swimming in the neighbor’s pool Monday with his 4-year-old sister under the supervision of his nanny when the near-drowning happened.

“She just turned her back to help Mia jump off the side, and he was in a floaty thing where your feet are in the water and you’re kind of supported, and he tried to get out,” said Clark. “So he wasn’t totally out, but his head was submerged.”

Gabriel was blue and not breathing by the time the nanny performed CPR on him. She then called 911 and Clark who is also a nurse.

The toddler was already responsive by the time paramedics arrived at the home, and they airlifted him to Rady Children’s Hospital.

Clark believes her nanny’s CPR knowledge, something she insisted on before hiring her, saved her son’s life.

“I don’t blame her. I think she did a wonderful job with the situation,” said Clark. “Water safety is so incredibly scary.”

It's a decision the hospital staff is encouraging every parent to make.

Gabriel is the sixth near-drowning victim rushed to Rady Children’s Hospital in two days, hospital officials say.

The hospital reported five separate cases on Sunday alone. Every case had a common denominator.

“It’s a split second. It’s when you take your eye off your child for just a moment’s notice. They’re fast, they’re quick, they love the water and in they go,” said nurse Oseana Bratton.

Experts say pools tend to be the last place people look when they realize a child is missing.

Staff at Rady Children's Hospital said parents need to remember the pool should be the first place they look because when it comes to drowning, every second counts.

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