Asiana Airlines Crash in San Francisco

Asiana Airlines Crash in San Francisco

Three Dead, 182 Hospitalized After Fiery Crash

Air Instructor Reacts to Flight 214 Pilot Interviews

Local independent flight instructor reacts to new details from the NTSB's interviews with Asiana Flight 214 pilots

By Stephen Stock, Julie Putnam and Jeremy Carroll
|  Monday, Dec 16, 2013  |  Updated 11:56 AM PDT
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Local independent flight instructor reacts to new details from the NTSB's interviews with Asiana Flight 214. Stephen Stock reports.

Local independent flight instructor reacts to new details from the NTSB's interviews with Asiana Flight 214. Stephen Stock reports.

advertisement
Photos and Videos

Flight Simulator Gives Cockpit View of Crash

A flight simulator provides a cockpit view from a Boeing 777 approaching SFO runway at speeds and altitudes of Asiana Flight 214. Stephen Stock reports.

NTSB: Lead Asiana Pilot Was New as Flight Instructor

NBC Bay Area's Cheryl Hurd and Stephen Stock provide the latest details released by the NTSB regarding the deadly Asiana Airlines Flight 214 plane crash.
More Photos and Videos

The NTSB has completed interviews with three of the four pilots flying Asiana Airlines Flight 214 when it crashed at SFO on Saturday and a local air instructor has insight into their stories of the last minute before the crash.

According to NTSB Chairman, Deborah Hersman, the instructor pilot overseeing the pilot landing the plane said in his interview that at five hundred feet he realized the plane was too low and instructed the pilot to pull back.

Black box data shows it was at this point that the plane dipped below the recommended landing speed and continued to slow. The data also shows the crew didn't react until 26 seconds later.

Max Trescott, an independent flight instructor,  told NBC Bay Area it appears they failed to monitor the speed.

"Every pilot knows from day one you have to focus on airspeed," Trescott said.

According to their interviews, the pilots told the NTSB they assumed the auto throttles were maintaining the speed.

"We all know about assuming and in this case it turned out to be a fatal assumption," Trescott said. "It’s essential for pilots, especially the pilot monitoring, to make sure the speed doesn’t get too slow regardless whether auto throttles are on or not."

"They made an assumption and were unable to notice that (until) it was too late," he said.

Hersman said the auto throttles were "armed" meaning they could have been in a position to be engaged and maintain speed, but they obviously did not do the job.

Whether this was a mechanical or human error remains to be determined.

"I'm sure the NTSB will be looking into that," Trescott said.  "There's no question that the auto throttles are the big insight that we gained today and probably the key to what went on."

Hersman also revealed Tuesday the plane had lateral, sideways movement shortly before touching ground.

Trescott said this could have served as a distraction to the pilots.

"It's quite possible the crew was focused on the deviation and failed to notice the decaying airspeed," he said. "The mistake was being low and slow and at that point too late to save the aircraft.."

Get the latest headlines sent to your inbox!
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Leave Comments
Bay Area Proud
Bay Area Proud is NBC Bay... Read more
Follow Us
Sign up to receive news and updates that matter to you.
Send Us Your Story Tips
Check Out