BART Suspends "Simple Approval" Safety Procedure in Wake of Worker Deaths

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    NEWSLETTERS

    NBC Bay Area
    National Transportation Safety Board investigators say the Bay Area Rapid Transit employee who was operating a train during an accident that killed two track workers was a trainee and did not have his safety certification.

    BART has suspended a procedure known as "simple approval" for workers conducting maintenance along transit train tracks, a BART spokeswoman said.

    The procedure was in effect when a BART employee and contractor were struck and killed by a BART train on Saturday.

    Track engineers Laurence Daniels, 66, and Christopher Sheppard, 58, were checking on a report of a dip in a stretch of trackway between the Walnut Creek and Pleasant Hill BART stations a short time before 2 p.m. Saturday when they were fatally hit by a BART train.

    2 Dead BART Workers in Charge of Own Safety: NTSB

    [BAY] 2 Dead BART Workers in Charge of Own Safety: NTSB
    National Transportation Safety Board investigators say under Bay Area Rapid Transit rules, the two track workers who were killed in an accident Saturday were responsible for their own safety. Terry McSweeney reports.

    RELATED: 2 Dead BART Workers in Charge of Own Safety: NTSB

    Under the now-suspended procedure, workers were responsible for their own safety and were not guaranteed to be given warnings of approaching trains.

    They were required to work in groups of at least two, with one person acting as a lookout, and to be prepared to be able to detect approach trains and leave the track within 15 seconds.

    MORE: BART Train Operator in Fatal Accident Was Trainee

    BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said, "As of Sunday, the operations staff was notified that Simple Approval access to the trackway was suspended until further notice.

    "We put a moratorium on the process in an abundance of caution to allow time to evaluate what happened and as a precautionary measure," Trost said.

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