[NATL]Typhoon Haiyan

NATL

Millions Need Food, Water Following Devastating Storm

Bay Area Doctors Head to Philippines to Aid Typhoon Haiyan Victims

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    For many who survived devastating Typhoon Haiyan the worst may still be ahead as victims cope with extreme hunger, contaminated water and infections. Marianne Favro reports. (Published Wednesday, Nov 13, 2013)

    For many who survived devastating Typhoon Haiyan the worst may still be ahead as victims cope with extreme hunger, contaminated water and infections.

    Doctors said diarrhea is a daily problem, leading to potentially deadly dehydration.

    SJSU Students Holding Relief Drive for Typhoon Haiyan Victims

    [BAY] SJSU Students Holding Relief Drive for Typhoon Haiyan Victims
    Student organizations at San Jose State University are working with the Bay Area non-profit Project Pearls, the LBC cargo company and the Philippines Red Cross to get food and supplies directly to victims of Typhoon Haiyan. George Kiriyama reports. (Published Monday, Nov 11, 2013)

    That's why Alex Huang plans to fly to the Philippines Saturday.

    Huang is the CEO of LiveLeaf in San Carlos, which makes an anti-diarheal product. He plans to bring suitcases full of the plant-based product.

    "We're hoping to get several thousands, tens of thousands of doses to health workers there to give the anti-diarheal product to them and get them back to work," he said.

    MORE: Aid to Philippines Picks Up as Typhoon Survivors Grow Desperate

    Huang said one dose can stop symptoms in just a few hours. The product has helped people in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

    Those injured in the typhoon may also soon receive medical attention from Dr. Enoch Choi's group, Jordan International Aid.

    The Redwood City urgent care doctor plans to send a team of about a 100 doctors and nurses from the Bay Area to provide medical care.

    "What we always find is there is an overwhelming need and we are there to provide care where patients can't get care," Choi said.

    More stories from NBC Bay Area: