Dangerously High Temperatures Spark Health, Air Quality, Power Outage Concerns Across Bay Area | NBC Bay Area
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Dangerously High Temperatures Spark Health, Air Quality, Power Outage Concerns Across Bay Area

An excessive heat warning is in effect and health officials are encouraging residents to stay safe

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    NEWSLETTERS

    (Published Thursday, June 22, 2017)

    The Bay Area is in the grips of a dangerous heat wave that was expected to peak Thursday. 

    A National Weather Service excessive heat warning is in effect until 9 p.m. The National Weather Service says they expect daily records for the Central Valley and the rest of the interior.

    High temperatures across the Bay Area are expected to range between 90 and 105 degrees across most inland areas with locally hotter temperatures possible, forecasters said.

    Caltrain posted on Twitter around 1:45 p.m. Thursday that a Level 1 heat restriction was in place on all main tracks that connect San Mateo and San Jose. That means trains will be running at slower speeds than normal. The restriction expired about 6:40 p.m.


    Two people died this week due to the extreme heat wave. A 72-year-old man and an 87-year-old woman died in San Jose Monday, when temperatures reached 94 degrees. A third person died Tuesday, but the Santa Clara County coroner has yet to confirm that it was caused by the heat.

    The soaring temperatures and stagnant air are also likely to create unhealthy levels of ozone, prompting the Bay Area Air Quality Management District to issue a Spare the Air alert for Thursday

    Strain on Power Grid as Heat Wave PeaksStrain on Power Grid as Heat Wave Peaks

    The Bay Area is in the grips of a dangerous heat wave that has already claimed three lives. Bob Redell reports.

    (Published Thursday, June 22, 2017)

    Another major concern during the scorching temperatures is a growing strain on the local power grid, which could prompt widespread outages. 

    All week, PG&E has been ramping up for Thursday.

    Crews have combed through neighborhoods on the hunt for vulnerable tree limbs, which were taken care of before they could fall and potentially take down light poles.

    The utility is using smart meters to identify outages faster than relying on customers calling in. PG&E meteorologists are also using outage prediction models to pinpoint where the heat could trigger power outages before they happen so crews can preemptively get in place.

    For a list of Cooling Centers and information on heat-related illnesses and prevention, visit the County of Santa Clara Office of Emergency Services website or call 211.

    People are being urged to take every possible precaution in the heat. Here are some ways to beat the heat:

    Additional tips for those who must work or exercise outdoors:

    • Ensure that cool drinking water is available.
    • Drink water or electrolyte-replacing sports drinks often; do not wait until you are thirsty.
    • Avoid drinking sweetened drinks, caffeine, and alcohol.
    • Avoid drinking extremely cold water as this is more likely to cause cramps.
    • Allow athletes or outdoor workers to take frequent rests.

    Older adults and individuals with chronic medical conditions:

    • During peak heat hours stay in an air-conditioned area. If you do not have access to air conditioning in your home, visit public facilities such as cooling centers, shopping malls, parks, and libraries to stay cool.
    • Older adults and those on certain medications may not exhibit signs of dehydration until several hours after dehydration sets in. Stay hydrated by frequently drinking cool water. If you’re on a special diet that limits liquids, check with your doctor for information on the amount of water to consume.
    • Stay out of the sun if you do not need to be in it. When in the sun, wear a hat, preferably with a wide brim, and loose-fitting, light-colored clothing with long sleeves and pants to protect against sun damage. And remember to use sun screen and to wear sunglasses.

    Infants and Children:

    • It is illegal to leave an infant or child unattended in a vehicle (California Vehicle Code Section 15620).
    • Infants and young children can get dehydrated very quickly. Make sure they are given plenty of cool water to drink.
    • Keep children indoors or shaded as much as possible.
    • Dress children in loose, lightweight, and light colored clothing.

    Pets:

    • Never leave a pet unattended in a vehicle, even with the windows cracked or open.
    • Outdoor animals should be given plenty of shade and clean drinking water.
    • Do not leave pets outside in the sun.
    • Pets should not be left in a garage as garages can get very hot due to lack of ventilation and insulation. 

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