California's Severe Drought Prompts New Restrictions on Bay Area Swimming Pools | NBC Bay Area
Bay Area Drought Watch

Bay Area Drought Watch

Coverage of California's looming water problem

California's Severe Drought Prompts New Restrictions on Bay Area Swimming Pools

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    California's severe drought is putting backyard pools under a microscope. Kimberly Tere reports. (Published Thursday, April 2, 2015)

    California's severe drought is putting backyard pools under a microscope.

    A handful of Bay Area cities have now stopped issuing permits to build new pools. Other cities, including Novato and Morgan Hill, have restrictions in place to keep residents from filling their pools.

    "If you've got a pool and it's already filled, you'll still be able to fill it up to a foot and that's a nice option for people, but it's not a year to build a new pool most likely," said Maureen Tobin, Morgan Hill communications manager.

    Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday ordered an unprecedented crackdown on water use. Brown said California residents need to change the way they live, but in a state with 1.8 million swimming pools that is easier said than done.

    Parched Calif. Sets Mandatory Water Restrictions

    [BAY] Parched Calif. Sets Mandatory Water Restrictions
    For the first time in state history, cities and towns across California must implement mandatory restrictions to reduce water use during the fourth consecutive year of drought under an executive order announced Wednesday by Gov. Jerry Brown. Jodi Hernandez reports.
    (Published Wednesday, April 1, 2015)

    "You're not going to get people to stop filling it and doing whatever they think is the best for their pool party or for the kids to swim, but there are ways they can prevent from using more water," said Drew Coppolino, who owns Freedom Pool Services.

    Coppolino said he has been trying to get customers to conserve water for several months.

    "It actually disappoints me a little bit that people aren't trying a little harder," Coppolino said. "I am still getting requests from people -- 'Can you drain my pool? How much would it be to drain my pool and refill it?'"

    Coppolino said there is almost always an alternative to wasting 30,000 gallons of water. He said there are other to conserve as well, like finding and repairing leaks and adding products that reduce pool evaporation rates.

    The California Pool and Spa Association is pushing hard against the new regulations. The associations said by the third year after installation, a backyard pool uses less water than a traditionally irrigated lawn.

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