Daylight Saving Time is Ending, Do You Know What Your Clock Says?

Set a reminder, we're falling back an hour into standard time.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Associated Press
    Changing your clocks at home should be a lot easier than this when daylight savings time end at 2 a.m. Sunday.

    No, Christmas isn’t early, but there will be a present waiting for you tomorrow morning: a little more time.

    Daylight saving time officially ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, when most Americans will gain back that extra hour they gave up in March.

    Springing forward and falling back was implemented during World Wars I and II to save energy, and daylight saving time was extended in 2007 with the U.S. Energy Policy Act.

    Changing the clocks saved three weeks earlier and one week later than usual cut U.S. electricity use by 0.5 percent per day, totaling about 1.3 billion kilowatt-hours, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    If you’re relying on older electronic devices, they may have fallen back last Sunday but there will be no repeat false alarm this weekend.

    With the exception of Hawaii and most of Arizona, Americans will fall back into standard time, and gain 60 minutes in the process.

    What will you do with the extra hour?