Delta Puts No Discrimination Pledge in Ink

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    A Delta Airlines plane is shown at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle. The airline put in writing that it will not participate in discriminatory practices against passengers.

    After verbal denying that it involved itself in discriminatory practices, Delta Airlines has confirmed in writing that it does not request that its passengers disclose their religious believes before boarding certain flights.

    In June, a report by Religion News Service said the airline had agreed to to prohibit Jewish, Israeli and other passengers with obvious non-Islamic religious gear from flying on U.S. to Saudi Arabia co-shared flights with the kingdom's national carrier starting next year.

    Delta strongly denied the report at the time but it wasn't enough for several American Jewish and Israeli organizations who demanded the airline put in writing that it would not participate in the reported practice.

    Last week the airline gave a response to an open letter from the Simon Wiesenthal Center and provided a written commitment that Delta will not ask passengers about their religious beliefs.

    Delta currently does not offer any direct flights from the Bay Area to Saudi Arabia. Instead it offers flights to Dubai and Tel Aviv.

    The airline initially said it could not control individual countries requirements for passengers and that it was forced to comply with all the laws of a host country.