Despite Fatal Grizzly Attack, Yellowstone Stays Crowded

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    This undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service shows a Grizzly Bear. Grizzly bear deaths approached record levels for the region around Yellowstone National Park in 2010, with an estimated 75 of the protected animals killed or removed from the wild. This week, a surprised Grizzly attacked and killed a park tourist.

    Few visitors to Yellowstone National Park at the height of tourist season seem inclined to change their vacations because of the park's first fatal grizzly mauling in 25 years.

    Officials say the sow that killed a Torrance, Calif. man Wednesday was only defending its cubs, had not threatened humans before, and would be left to wander the wilderness.

    Elizabeth Hoffman, a visitor from California, agreed with the decision. She said the area is "bear country" and noted that the bear has to care for its cubs.

    On Thursday, cars jammed Yellowstone's roadways for wildlife spottings, including a 20-minute delay while motorists gawked at two black bear cubs romping in a field while their mother rooted around in the grass nearby.

    The grizzly attacked and killed Brian Matayoshi after he and his wife surprised the bear foraging with its cubs nearby.