Habitat for Humanity, Redwood City Residents in Fight Over Low-Income Housing Complex | NBC Bay Area
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Habitat for Humanity, Redwood City Residents in Fight Over Low-Income Housing Complex

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    Habitat for Humanity is in the works of constructing an apartment complex for low-income families in Redwood City, but some neighbors say the plan will negatively impact the community. Michelle Roberts reports.

    (Published Friday, May 19, 2017)

    Habitat for Humanity is in the works of constructing an apartment complex for low-income families in Redwood City, but some neighbors aren't too happy about the plan.

    The complex located along Jefferson Avenue will house 20 units in a six-story building with one story designated for parking.

    Geoff Car, speaking on behalf of several neighbors who filed a complaint with the city's planning commission, is upset that the proposed building will sit between historical buildings as well as increase congestion in the area.

    "I hate putting a six-story pole in the middle of two to three historical buildings," Car said. "It's not what we consider appropriate respect for the historical status that we have."

    A one bedroom pad in downtown Redwood City currently goes for roughly $2,800 per month. Habitat For Humanity hopes to offer a cheaper option with its complex, and Maureen Sedonaen from the nonprofit expects hundreds of people in need to apply for the affordable housing. She also argues that the building's residents will benefit the community.

    "They are working families often who are often our emergency responders, our teachers, our ibrarians, and they’re trying to raise their families and plant their roots," she said.

    Redwood City officials on Monday will consider Car's complaint and a request to cap the building at three stories. Following through with a limit would negatively impact Habitat for Humanity's goal.

    "If we had to cut out units, we'd have to cut out the three and two bedroom units, which basically limits the number of families that we can do because then they're in the one bedroom unit," Sedonaen said.

    If the city moves forward with construction, Car plans to sue the city and Habitat for Humanity.

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