John McAfee: FBI Doesn't Have 'the Talent' to Crack San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone | NBC Bay Area
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John McAfee: FBI Doesn't Have 'the Talent' to Crack San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone

The cybersecurity guru told NBC Bay Area the hackers who could help the feds crack the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone won't be hired by the government because they have "purple mohawks, face tattoos" and "smoke weed all day long."

"First of all, there is nothing that is unhackable." Thus begins Scott Budman's interview with John McAfee. (Published Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016)

"First of all, there is nothing that is unhackable."

Thus begins the interview with John McAfee, who, having started McAfee Associates back in 1987 on his way to being worth close to $100 million, is still many years and many bizarre actions later a well-respected security voice.

McAfee wrote an Op-Ed piece for Business Insider in which he claims to be able to hack the now infamous iPhone.

Is this something our government can't do on its own?

"No. And why can't the FBI do this on their own?" he said. "I believe they simply do not have the talent."

"They don't have the personnel. And how could they? We're talking people with purple mohawks, face tattoos. They smoke weed all day long! Things that could keep them from working with the government."

But McAfee, who insists that he supports Tim Cook and Apple's stance on the case, says he can help both sides: Get the FBI the information it wants, while letting Apple off the hook.

"I have friends," he says. "They can tell you what the operating system is doing, in short order."

FBI'S Order to Apple to Reveal iPhone Information 'Dangerous,' Electronic Frontier Foundation Says

[BAY] FBI'S Order to Apple to Reveal iPhone Information 'Dangerous,' Electronic Frontier Foundation Says
The FBI'S order to Apple to help them figure out the password of San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook's iPhone is "unprecedented and dangerous," said Nate Cardozo of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. But refusing to hack into users' phones is something Apple Tim Cook openly talked about at Stanford University in 2015. Bob Redell and Scott McGrew report. (Published Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016)

Does he expect to be called by the FBI?

"No, probably not, but they're the FBI. They know how to reach me."

Scott tracks Apple, and security, on Twitter: @scottbudman

 

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