SF Supes Split on Ranked-Choice Voting

Confusing, confused, or confounded: Ranked-choice voting causes a divide.

By Chris Roberts
|  Tuesday, Dec 13, 2011  |  Updated 7:15 AM PDT
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
SF Supes Split on Ranked-Choice Voting

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In Russia, voting rank-choices you!

advertisement

First, second, third -- and done.

San Francisco's ranked-choice voting system is drawing ire from elected officials on both sides of the City's aisle -- that is, Democrat and progressive Democrat -- who may soon introduced competing measures to do away with the nine-year old voting system, according to the San Francisco Examiner.

For the uninitiated -- which includes most San Francisco voters, according to Supervisor Mark Farrell, who introduced legislation to do away with ranked-choice voting on Election Day -- a voter selects up to three candidates and ranks them first, second, or third in ranked-choice voting, or instant runoff voting.

The candidate with the least amount of first-place votes at the end of voting is eliminated. A voter who had that candidate first will now have their second-place choice count towards that candidate's vote total. And so on, until one candidate has a majority.

Ranked-choice voting was an important issue for progressives, who helped pass it in 2002. But progressive Supervisor David Campos is considering doing away with ranked-choice voting, too introducing a measure to counter Farrell's bill, he told the San Francisco Examiner.

Ranked-choice voting does save the City some money -- prior to ranked-choice, the top vote-getting candidates advanced to a second runoff election, which costs money.

Get the latest headlines sent to your inbox!
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Leave Comments
Bay Area Proud
Bay Area Proud is NBC Bay... Read more
Follow Us
Sign up to receive news and updates that matter to you.
Send Us Your Story Tips
Check Out