Morning Briefs: Apple Moves to a Cloud

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    NEWSLETTERS

    This is where your iTunes library will live.

    • The Wall Street Journal reports Apple will quickly adopt lessons learned from its new aquisition LaLa and make changes to iTunes to move songs "into the cloud".  As internet connectivity becomes more common, people are finding it bothersome to have their songs stuck on one certain device.

       

    • That said, maybe you can be TOO connected.  The head of AT&T's customer services says the company may have to adopt limits to its unlimited data plan, as iPhone-wielding bandwidth hogs slow down the network in San Francisco and New York City.  AT&T says 3% of users account for 40% of data traffic.  
    • You'll see a warning screen when you log onto Facebook this morning alerting you to changes to the privacy policies.  Facebook wants to make postings more available to "real time searches" (read: become more Twitter-like) and thus is opting everyone in to a new public feed. You must make the change to keep your updates private.  Expect to see some sort of scandal soon after someone who ignored the warning posts something to their Facebook wall not realizing it's now public.
       
    • The grandaddy of social networks, Friendster, has been sold to an Asian companyFriendster is long forgotten in America, but in fact is the No. 1 social network in parts of Southeast Asia -- in particular, the Philippines.
       
    • Both the New York Times' David Pogue and The Journal's Walt Mossberg have published their reviews of the Barnes and Noble Nook e-book reader.  They are not good reviews.  I'll point out the Nook was mentioned as a "don't buy" in my Giftolicious Guide last month.