Mountain View Police Hold School Meeting to Raise Drug Awareness

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Mountain View police held a meeting Thursday to raise awareness to parents on the drugs their students are exposed to. Jean Elle reports. (Published Thursday, Apr 3, 2014)

    Mountain View police held a meeting Thursday to raise awareness about the drugs students are exposed to.

    The presentation, held at Mountain View High School, comes weeks after a student was found unresponsive on the Stevens Creek trail. Police believe the local student took "DOC," a street drug that is a combination of amphetamine and hallucinogenic chemicals.

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    Unlike simple amphetamines, DOC is considered a chemical that influences cognitive and perception processes of the brain. The strongest supposed effects include open and closed eye visuals, increased awareness of sound and movement, and euphoria.

    The student survived the incident, but it served as a wake up call to teens.

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    "I thought it was freaky," student Ivan Calleja said. "It's the trail I take home."

    Calleja said the incident shocked the Mountain View High School campus. He added that some students need to see what police presented at Thursday's meeting.

    "I know a few people I think do drugs," he said. "They are oblivious to the situation."

    Calleja wasn't the only one who found the presentation useful. His mother, Alba Alamillo, learned more about where teens may be hiding their drugs.

    "He's a good kid, but you have to know to be on top of things," Alamillo said.