Naked Neck Chicken With Black Eye Now Beloved

New owner not sure if Timmy can produce eggs.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Peninsula Humane Society
    Timmy the Transylvanian naked neck was found, injured, in East Palo Alto on Oct. 7. After antibiotics and treatment, he or she was available for adoption.

    A naked neck chicken named Timmy who was found with a wounded wing  and a swollen eye last month has recovered and was adopted today in  Burlingame, a Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA spokesman said.

    Timmy was found in East Palo Alto on Oct. 7 by a resident who  called the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA to get help with what the person  thought was a quail, shelter spokesman Scott Delucchi said.

    Staff members weren't sure what it was either and decided to  settle on calling it a turken.

    Timmy, who is about 2 months old and 10 inches tall, is actually a  type of chicken called a naked neck or Transylvania naked neck. They are  common in Europe, but they are rare in North America.

    Timmy's feathers are a multitude of colors, including brown, black  and gold. The chicken doesn't have feathers on its neck or chest, which is  reportedly normal, Delucchi said.

    While Timmy was first thought to be a male, now those caring for  Timmy are thinking it may be a female.

    "There are dog people out there and cat people, and we are hoping  there is a turken person," Delucchi said this morning. "People are definitely  interested. All we need is one."

    It turns out there was one.

    Shortly after the shelter opened, a Brisbane hen owner adopted  Timmy from the Tom and Annette Lantos Center for Compassion at 1450 Rollins  Road.

    "She believes Timmy is Tammy based on the feathers," Delucchi  said. "If Timmy is Timmy she will find a farm for him." Most cities don't  allow roosters.

    Timmy's new owner is part of a tight community of hen owners who  share eggs, according to Delucchi. Within a couple months, its owner should  know if the naked neck will be contributing to the egg exchange or finding  new digs on a farm.

    Bay City News