Report: Silicon Valley Schools Do Poor Job of Preparing Latinos for College

Report also indicates that a whopping 80 percent of Latinos leave high school not eligible to enter the University of California or California State University systems

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A stinging report on Tuesday indicates Silicon Valley schools are doing a poor job of preparing Latino students for college. Damian Trujillo has an exclusive report. (Published Tuesday, May 28, 2013)

    A stinging report on Tuesday indicates Silicon Valley schools are doing a poor job of preparing Latino students for college.

    The research was conducted by a new group called Innovate Public Schools, and it shows only 78 of Latinos are algebra proficient by 8th grade in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

    To view the entire report, click here. (PDF)

    The report also indicates that a whopping 80 percent of Latinos leave high school not eligible to enter the University of California or California State University systems.

    “The days of being able to get a good job if you have just a high school education , those days are long gone,” said Matt Hammer, the executive director of Innovate Public Schools. “You have to have some sort of post high school certificate or degree if you’re going to have access to some of the good jobs in Silicon Valley."

    The group looked at test scores statewide and other data in determining the ranking of Latinos.

    Surprisingly, some of the highest scoring schools are in San Jose’s Alum Rock School District, located in a traditionally less affluent part of the city, but which has strong dual language immersion programs and alternative school options, while Sunnyvale rated near the bottom.

    The authors of the report or strong advocates of charter schools, and some of those are the schools ranked higher in the report. The group says the information is not pro or anti charter schools, just an in-depth look at the school numbers.

    At least one South Bay educator agreed with the findings.

    “I think it’s time to revisit the structure to see if we’re maximizing opportunities for students,” said   Santa Clara County Supt. of Public Schools Xavier De La Torre.

    De La Torre said blame should be placed everywhere, including Sacramento lawmakers for slashing school funds.

    “I think it will certainly result in local boards having conversations and asking questions about what can be done,” De La Torre said.

    Innovate Public Schools will officially release its report on Wednesday along with school leaders from Santa Clara and San Mateo counties and Carl Guardino, CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group. 

    On Wednesday city leaders and educators responded to the report.

    Kris Sanchez has that in the below video:

    View more videos at: http://nbcbayarea.com.