Ross Mirkarimi Begins Sentence

Suspended from work as sheriff, Ross Mirkarimi still had to report to the Hall of Justice today

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Suspended San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi appeared at the San Francisco Hall of Justice this afternoon for an orientation with the adult  probation department.
        Mirkarimi was sentenced Monday to three years' probation, 100 hours of community service and 52 weeks of domestic violence counseling,  among other penalties.

        The sentence was handed down after he pleaded guilty last week to a misdemeanor false imprisonment charge in connection with an alleged  domestic violence incident on Dec. 31 involving his wife.     Mayor Ed Lee on Wednesday suspended Mirkarimi without pay on official misconduct charges, which will be considered by the city's Ethics Commission at a hearing in the coming days.
        The Ethics Commission will then make a non-binding recommendation to the Board of Supervisors, which would need nine of the 11 supervisors to approve the charges for Mirkarimi to be removed from office.
        Before being suspended, Mirkarimi said, "I do not believe that the  conduct that I have taken responsibility for constitutes official misconduct" and said he looks forward to arguing his case with the Ethics Commission and  Board of Supervisors.
        He declined to comment further today, saying, "I think I've said  everything."
        Mirkarimi's new attorney, David Waggoner, has recent history with the Board of Supervisors, which considered him last June as a potential  police commissioner.
        Mirkarimi was a member of the board for the last seven years until he was elected sheriff in November, and voted to make Waggoner a police commissioner when a spot on the panel opened up last year.
        Waggoner, the former president of the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic  Club, was one of two candidates being considered at a June 14 board hearing to replace Jim Hammer, who decided not to reapply for a seat on the  commission.
        Supervisor John Avalos proposed selecting Waggoner, and Mirkarimi,  Eric Mar and Jane Kim also voted for him.
        However, the seven other supervisors opposed naming Waggoner to the commission, and the board ended up selecting Julius Turman, a former federal prosecutor, to the position.
        Waggoner was not immediately available today to discuss  Mirkarimi's case.