Ross Mirkarimi to Ask Judge for Family Visits

Former San Francisco supervisor is blocked from visiting his family.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Brian Kusler
    Ross Mirkarimi will be back in court on Friday asking the judge for permission to visit with his family.

    San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi will return to court on Friday to try again to modify acourt order preventing him from contacting his wife or son because of an alleged domestic violence incident on New Year's Eve, his attorney said Tuesday.

    Mirkarimi's defense attorney Lidia Stiglich said via email Tuesday that she filed papers Monday and additional papers Tuesday to request the hearing to modify the stay-away order, which is preventing him from contacting his wife, Eliana Lopez, and the couple's 2-year-old son Theo.

    The order was issued when Mirkarimi was charged on Jan. 13 with misdemeanor domestic violence battery, child endangerment and dissuading a witness in connection with an incident on Dec. 31 involving Lopez, during which Theo was present, prosecutors said.

    It is currently in effect at least through the end of the trial, which starts Feb. 24.

    San Francisco Superior Court Judge Susan Breall has twice denied requests to modify or remove the stay-away order, but last week encouraged Mirkarimi to seek a modification of the order in a separate family court, which Breall said is the court's standard procedure.

    Mirkarimi will appear in family court on Friday morning at the county courthouse on McAllister Street, Stiglich said.

    Stiglich argued in court last week that the stay-away order has left Theo "devastated at being separated from his father."

    She also said Mirkarimi has taken multiple counseling sessions since the case came to light and "takes all these allegations very seriously."

    The case stems from a Dec. 31 argument between Mirkarimi and Lopez during which he allegedly grabbed her arm and caused a bruise on her bicep.

    Mirkarimi could face a year in prison and three years' probation if convicted of all charges.