<![CDATA[NBC Bay Area - National & International News]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/national-internationalhttp://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/nbc_bayarea_blue.pngNBC Bay Areahttp://www.nbcbayarea.comen-usMon, 26 Jun 2017 05:14:54 -0700Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:14:54 -0700NBC Owned Television Stations<![CDATA[Captain Asks Passengers to Pray During Shaky Air Asia Flight]]>Mon, 26 Jun 2017 02:08:28 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/173164274.jpg

Passengers of a Sunday morning Air Asia flight said their captain asked them to pray — twice — as the plane experienced engine trouble and shook like a "washing machine," NBC News reported.

Damien Stevens, who was on the flight from Perth, Australia, to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, told NBC News the plane shook after a “huge bang” about 75 minutes into the flight.

"The rattling started straight away," Stevens said. "It was like being in a washing machine... The pilot asked us to pray twice and said he was scared too."

The exact cause of the incident remains unclear, but Stevens said the airline told him the trouble stemmed from one of the engines and that the pilot had 44 years of experience. The plane landed safely back in Perth and there were no reported injuries.



Photo Credit: Goh Seng Chong/Bloomberg via Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Air Asia Plane Shakes Violently After Technical Failure]]>Mon, 26 Jun 2017 02:24:14 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Screen-Shot-2017-06-26-at-5.23.23-AM.jpg

A Sunday morning Air Asia flight heading from Perth, Australia, to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, was forced to turn around after suffering a technical failure that caused the plane to shake violently. Passenger video showed the heavy shaking, with some comparing it to that of a washing machine.

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<![CDATA[Rainbows Shine as Cities Across the US Celebrate Pride]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 12:49:01 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/pridefeuerherdVI.jpgJune marks Pride Month in the U.S. Take a look at scenes from marches and rallies around the country that call for support of the LGBTQ community.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Manning Takes Part in 1st Pride March Since Prison Release]]>Mon, 26 Jun 2017 01:23:27 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-694226476.jpg

Chelsea Manning, the former U.S. Army Intelligence analyst who leaked information to WikiLeaks, took part on Sunday in her first Pride March since being released from prison last month, NBC News reported.

Manning rode in cars for the American Civil Liberties Union and said she was "honored to represent" the organization at the parade in New York City.

Manning, who came out publicly as transgender in 2013, rode alongside Gavin Grimm, the transgender teen who sued his school for denying him access to the boys' bathroom.

The 29-year-old was released from military prison in May after serving seven years of a 35-year sentence for leaking intelligence records. President Barack Obama commuted her sentence in January.



Photo Credit: Heidi Gutman/ABC via Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Hackers Post Pro-ISIS Messages on Ohio Government Sites ]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 22:27:01 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/166323747-computer-generic.jpg

Hackers targeted at least seven Ohio government websites to publish pro-ISIS messages and criticism of President Donald Trump, state officials said Sunday.

As NBC News reported, the message appeared on the website for Gov. John Kasich and his wife, Karen, as well as government agencies, including those for Medicaid, corrections, and workforce transformation.

"You will be held accountable Trump, you and all your people for every drop of blood flowing in Muslim countries," the message read.

No personal information was compromised and all affected servers were taken offline, state official Tom Hoyt told NBC affiliate WCMH.



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Diner Finds Dead Frog in Salad at LA Restaurant]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 19:57:57 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/frogsalad2.jpg

Officials with the BJ's Restaurants chain said they're investigating how a dead frog wound up in a diner's salad at one of the company's locations in West Covina, Los Angeles County.

Shawna Cepeda posted a picture of her salad with a frog that appeared to be the size of two croutons in a Yelp review on June 14. Cepeda couldn't be reached Saturday, but in her Yelp post, she said she ate at the restaurant the previous night and ordered a side salad.

"I was about four bites into it and I noticed it tasted a little different," she wrote. "I thought maybe the ranch dressing was a little bitter, and after mixing the salad around some more I found a dead baby frog."

The manager offered to comp her meal, which she declined.

She said corporate apologized and sent her a $50 gift card.

Krysteen Romero, the general manager at the restaurant, posted a comment on Cepeda's Yelp page more than a week later apologizing and offering to speak to her directly.

In a statement issued to NBC4, BJ's Chief Financial Officer Greg Levin said the company takes this seriously and they "have launched an internal investigation including discussions with our suppliers and distributors to ensure that nothing like this happens in the future."



Photo Credit: Shawna Cepeda]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Acknowledges Russian Election ‘Meddling’ in Tweet]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 20:11:52 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/trump-face-wahhh.jpg

President Donald Trump appeared to acknowledge Russian meddling in the presidential election on Twitter Friday, attacking former President Barack Obama.

"Just out," Trump tweeted, "The Obama Administration knew far in advance of November 8th about election meddling by Russia. Did nothing about it. WHY?"

Trump may have been referencing a Washington Post report that the CIA had confirmed Russian President Vladimir Putin’s direct influence on his government's alleged interference in the 2016 election.

Trump on Saturday tried to shift the attention on the Obama administration for Russian interference. "Focus on them, not T!" the president tweeted.



Photo Credit: Evan Vucci/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Versus the World: An Overview]]>Tue, 02 May 2017 04:03:08 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-654571120.jpg

Since taking office in January, President Donald Trump's administration has been associated with one foreign country in particular, Russia. U.S. intelligence officials say President Vladimir Putin ordered a campaign to influence the U.S. presidential election, to denigrate Hillary Clinton and then to help Trump's chances. Trump denies any wrongdoing, while the FBI and Congress investigate his administration's contacts with Russia.

Meanwhile Trump has flirted with upending U.S. foreign policy, threatening to declare China a currency manipulator and to pull out of NAFTA, for example, questioning the one-China policy under which the United States recognizes China and not Taiwan and backing off a U.S. commitment to the two-state solution to the Israel-Palestinian conflict. In the end, though, Trump has often reverted to traditional policies. His supporters say he is scrutinizing foreign agreements with the goal of benefitting Americans, but critics say the uncertainty is unsettling to allies and unproductive.

Here are some of the more significant interactions between the Trump administration and world leaders over international issues.



Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
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<![CDATA[School Librarians Embrace Technology — If the Budget Allows]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 20:54:08 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/burlesonfeuerherd.JPG

In a profession most readily associated with the printed word, school librarians have embraced what may seem like an unlikely tool.

Librarians in public schools across the country are mixing new technologies like iPads and the internet with old to teach their students fundamental skills, while also preparing them for the digital age. But their progress is threatened by a familiar problem in education: funding.

“Librarians are really embracing technology and integrating tech tools into their teaching in very meaningful and effective ways. The issue for school librarians is budget,” said Kathy Ishizuka, executive editor of the publication School Library Journal.

Librarians in schools that have robust support have seized the opportunity.

Todd Burleson, the school librarian at Hubbard Woods Elementary School in suburban Winnetka, Illinois, is running with technological innovation. In his library, technology isn't just used to consume information on a screen, it's used to create it, he said.

On an average day, his elementary school students may be producing their first book on an iPad, complete with self-shot photos, digitally-produced drawings and audio tracking. Or they may be using a green-screen iPad app to layer-separate animated sequences to produce videos.

But Burleson hasn’t shelved the hardcover books.

Children’s books offer stories that are written specifically for their reading level, something a Google search does not do.

“Books are one of the most valuable pieces of information that we can get,” he said.

Navigating this mix of technology and traditional media – “books and bytes,” as Burleson calls it – is, for him, why school librarians are so essential in the 21st century, and other school library advocates agree.

“Just because the children have that device in their hand, or have access to that essential information, does not mean they can find it efficiently and evaluate once they’ve found it,” said Audrey Church, president of the American Association of School Librarians. “I think we need librarians in schools now more than ever because of that teacher role they play in the area of information literacy and digital literacy.”

It’s now part of librarians’ jobs to teach students to be effective users of technology. This includes showing them how to identify appropriate online sources, condensing search results — even sniffing out fake news.

But training kids in new technology is not possible if the funds are not there.

In many cases, sheer cost puts libraries on the chopping block, said Christie Kaaland, a school library advocate and director of the library education program at Antioch University.

“A library is expensive. Print material is expensive. Technology is expensive,” Kaaland said.

Library funding is not equal across the United States. Certain states require a certified librarian to be on staff at every public school. Others do not.

In wealthier districts, librarians can rely on parent-teacher organizations to provide funds. In others, librarians often rely on grants to supplement the money budgeted for the purpose.

In some districts, tightening funds simply means fewer school libraries and certified librarians on staff.

In New York City, the largest school district in the country, the number of school libraries more than halved from 2005 to 2014, from 1,500 to about 700. In Philadelphia, another of the largest districts in the country, just eight full-time librarians are employed. 

Librarian and advocate Tracey Wong saw the effects of funding cuts firsthand at public elementary schools in low-income neighborhoods of the Bronx, New York.

Wong’s first librarian job at P.S. 63 in the Bronx evaporated when her principal pulled funding and shut down the school’s library, she said.

After that, she went to work at another low-income public school in the Bronx, where she secured just under $1 million in about three years through private grants. With the funds, she brought in laptops, computers, iPads, a smartboard, and transformed the once-decrepit library into a bustling media center.

The new tools paid off: One of her students won an academic contest and was selected as one of five kids in the country to meet billionaire businessman Warren Buffet. Another won $500 in a separate contest and was taken to City Hall to meet the mayor of New York.

But despite her successes, Wong’s library eventually went the way of P.S. 63.

“A new principal came on board,” Wong said. “So by my third year being a librarian, she decided to shut down the library and was going to make me a fifth grade teacher.”

Instead, Wong left the New York City school system to work as a librarian in neighboring Westchester County.

Wong’s experience, while disheartening, came as no surprise, she said.

From the time she was studying to become a certified librarian, Wong was told to expect job loss and funding cuts.

The reality made Wong an advocate for libraries from the start. She secured grants to fund technology for her schools; lobbied principals to reopen libraries that had been shut; and now tracks her professional experiences on her website and frequently writes about how educators can secure grants for their schools.

“Advocacy is something you have to work on early, it’s the most important part of your job,” Wong recalled being told while earning her degree. “If you don’t start to do it, you’re going to realize you should’ve been doing it, and by that time it’s going to be too late because they’re always cutting jobs.”



Photo Credit: Courtesy of Todd Burleson]]>
<![CDATA[Donald Trump Through the Years]]>Mon, 22 May 2017 13:02:14 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Trumpthumb.jpgWhat Donald Trump's presidency will look like is unclear to many observers. He has not previously worked in politics, and has made contradictory statements on policy issues in several areas during his campaign. Despite the unknowns, Trump has an extensive public profile that, along with his real estate empire and the Trump brand, grew domestically and internationally over the last few decades. Here is a look at the president-elect's personal and career milestones and controversies.

Photo Credit: AP, Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[The Cost of School Supplies Is Rising, Fast: Survey]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 20:02:00 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/199*120/Generic-kids.jpg

The cost of raising a child has decreased slightly, but it's a different story for their school supplies. They've gotten steadily more expensive since 2007.

In the last decade, the price of supplies and extracurricular activities increased by 88 percent for elementary school students, 81 percent for middle school students and 68 percent for high school students, according to the latest Huntington Backpack Index, an annual survey of the cost of school supplies and other expenses compiled by The Huntington National Bank and school support nonprofit Communities in Schools.

The index, now in its 10th year, tracks the costs of required classroom supplies and school fees that parents have to pay, in an effort to show that public school costs more than just what's assessed in taxes. It's one of the few figures that tracks the cost of school supplies.


(Disclosure: Communities in Schools is a partner of NBC- and Telemundo-owned stations' Supporting Our Schools campaign.)

The Backpack Index was just shy of $1,500 for high schoolers last year, the most recent year available. It was $957 for middle schoolers and $659 for elementary schoolers.

Meanwhile, raising a single child in the United States was projected to set parents back between between $12,350 and $13,900 annually, between food, housing, education and more. That figure is lower by several hundred dollars than two years before, according to the most recent U.S. Department of Agriculture "Cost of Raising a Child" reports.

Every school year, teachers send out a list of school supplies and fees that will cover the student for the year. Between 2007 and 2016, prices for school supplies rose by an estimated $10, according to the index. If a high school student plays more than one sport, that'll incur up to $375 in fees, an 87.5 percent leap from 2015.

One of every five school-age children was living below the federal poverty line in 2014, nearly 11 million children in all, according to U.S. Department of Education data. Many of the students struggle with the cost of basic school supplies, let alone the cost for school sports, clubs or activities.

"We need to be sure that every child in America comes to school equipped for success," said Dale Erquiaga, president and CEO of Communities In Schools, in an email. "That's why we are proud to be working with NBCUniversal and United Way on the Supporting Our Schools initiative. By encouraging back-to-school shoppers to add a few extra supplies to their shopping lists or to donate online, we can be sure that no student starts out behind on the very first day of school."



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
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<![CDATA[As School Gardens Grow, So Do the Students Who Tend Them]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 14:03:06 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/212*120/IMG_03194.JPG

For Rebecca Lemos-Otero, the founder of a nonprofit that creates school gardens, plots of vegetables and flowers don't only offer new ways to teach science or math. And give kids opportunities to be outside and moving about. And show them that their neighborhoods can be green and beautiful.

School gardens also leave some students with a taste for much-maligned kale and other fruits and vegetables they've grown themselves, Lemos-Otero said.

"The expectation that kale is part of your meal, versus this exotic food that it felt like 10 years ago, it's amazing," Lemos-Otero said.

Some organizations gather school supplies like notebooks, pens and backpacks, but her organization, City Blossoms, works directly with a dozen schools, mostly in Washington D.C., to supply them with gardens and keep them going year after year.

The goal for the 10-year-old organization is to make gardening routine for the students, not a special event. Older students sell their produce at farmers markets or to their teachers in school-based community supported agriculture subscriptions.

"They become more comfortable with expecting to try different foods. They become much more comfortable with exploring the food that's put in front of them, especially if they have something to do with the preparation or the growing of it," Lemos-Otero said.

Edna Chirico of the nonprofit Real School Gardens said she has seen a similar change.

"It is amazing," she said. "If they grow it, if they take care of it, if someone shows them how to cook it, the students eat it 100 percent of the time."

Some of the gardens are quite elaborate.

Real School Gardens works with schools to develop deluxe gardens, which they call outdoor classrooms. In a three-year process, teachers, students and community members can submit design ideas for the space, which include things like whiteboards, student seating areas that are shaded from sun or protected from rain, a shed full of school supplies.

Those features are intended to eliminate the possibility that a teacher might say, "Well, we were going to go outside for class today, BUT..."

"Beyond just going outside and having fun, it's about learning. Every piece of that space is intentional and has a reason for being there," said April Martin, the group's Mid-Atlantic regional director.

Real School Gardens has partnered with schools across the country for these large-scale projects, which are available only to low-income schools that apply for the program and meet qualifying criteria. It also services schools that already have garden spaces or standing beds on their campuses but want to learn more about how to integrate garden projects into learning across subjects.

School gardens remain popular, despite all of the criticism of former first lady Michelle Obama's push for healthy school lunches and claims from school cafeterias of millions of dollars in food being discarding because students refused to eat. There were more than 7,000 across the country in 2015, according to a census done by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The federal government — which built a "School Garden Army" during World War I and backed victory gardens at schools in World War II — encourages gardens through grants, guidance and support for food purchased from them, according to the USDA.

Today, City Blossoms and Real School Gardens are just two of many nonprofits working to get gardens up and running, in schools and elsewhere. Parents and others can contribute to the organizations or in some cases volunteer in the gardens. Groups also seek donations of plants and other supplies.

Even if the garden programs do not address school lunches directly, as Real School Gardens says, by transforming the outdoors into a space for structured open-air learning, students are able to spend more time outside, with dirt and earthworms, kale and potatoes, and to see how fresh foods grow.

That's important for children who know little about agriculture, especially those who live in cities. (Or adults for that matter: A recent survey by the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy found that seven percent of American adults believe chocolate milk comes from brown cows.)

"We really want them to be able to connect with where their food comes from," said Jenny Schrum, director of youth programming at City Green, which works with 80 schools in New Jersey.

"There's many children who did not know that vegetables come from the ground, so it's very eye-opening," she said.

One thing that school gardens aren't necessarily doing is growing food that students, well, eat. Which is understandable, given various practical restraints like how much and what can be grown on a particular plot. Even a fairly large school garden couldn't provide food on the mini-industrial scale necessary to feed hundreds of kids daily.

But some schools are trying to get a taste of what they've grown into the schools.

The 14 schools in Charlotte, North Carolina, that are partnered with Real School Gardens all focus on the same "big six" vegetables: broccoli, carrots, peas, cabbage, spinach and cauliflower — plus, a bonus seventh vegetable, the sweet potato. Having students grow the same foods that they see on their lunch trays, even if not the produce from their gardens, gives them the chance to make connections between food production and food consumption, the group says.



Photo Credit: Courtesy of City Blossoms]]>
<![CDATA[Classroom Gadgets: Supplies Go From Old School to High Tech]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 13:26:27 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/armus-smartboard.jpg

The days of notebooks, chalkboards and flour sack babies in schools across the country may be ending. Many of today’s schools are incorporating Chromebooks, Smart Boards, and even high-tech infant simulators that are taking the classroom into a highly digitized 21st century.

As tablets, laptops and apps have taken hold with consumers in recent years, they have also gained a steady following within schools, said Ellen Meier, a professor at Teachers’ College at Columbia University.

One influential addition in many classrooms is the Chromebook, a low-cost, simplified laptop, loaded with Google apps like an internet browser and word processor, that can work offline. Last year, Chromebooks made up 5.4 million of the devices sold for U.S. classrooms, or just under half of the total, according to the Associated Press.

Chicago Public Schools has spent about $33.5 million to provide Chromebooks for more than a third of its 381,000 students, The New York Times Magazine reported. “In less than 10 seconds, a student can grab a Chromebook and be off and running,” Rajen Sheth, who oversees Google’s Chromebook business, told the magazine.

With these basic laptops or tablets like iPads, schools can create virtual classroom hubs that let students view assignments, submit homework and talk to teachers online on platforms like Moodle and Blackboard.

Meier, who directs Columbia’s Center for Technology and School Change, said that schools are facing a growing impetus to make sure that more students have experience using keyboards because tests are increasingly being administered online.

Cassettes or CDs in foreign language classes, meanwhile, are getting competition from interactive language lessons apps like DuoLingo. It's being used by tens of thousands of students, according to the company.

“More and more technology is being used in classrooms for practicing math and reading skills,” Eric Cayton, vice president of merchandising at Staples, said in an email. “In order to do this work independently, headphones now often appear on [back-to-school] shopping lists for students in elementary school.”

But the digital revolution in the classroom isn’t just tied to the arrival of laptops and tablets. High-tech reinventions of traditional school supplies are starting to make older models obsolete.

The same way that classic chalkboards were phased out in favor of dry-erase boards in the late 1990s, the Smart Board — an interactive whiteboard/projector combo — is now the board of choice in many classrooms. Texas Instruments, meanwhile, has kept its monopoly on calculators with the TI-Nspire, a modern version of the company’s bulky devices from the 80s and 90s.

More than three million classrooms now use Smart Boards, whose latest model of touch TVs can hook up to Chromebooks, according to a Smart Board representative.

Benjamin Glazer, an editor at consumer shopping website DealNews, said he predicts that many traditional items on back-to-school lists may also receive a digital update soon.

“There’s a strong possibility you might see things like smart binders or smart notebooks where you can access calendars and schedules from a touch screen inside the notebook,” he said.

But what’s often more important than the technology itself is how it ends up being used in the classroom, researchers say.

“The Smart Boards have become well-known for replacing blackboards, but they have so many things that we often don’t prepare our teachers to do,” Meier said. “There’s going to be an ongoing parade of new devices, but devices are not the answer in terms of how we can use these tools for more thoughtful teaching and learning.”

In any case, the most basic supplies — like paper, pencils and erasers — won’t be going away anytime soon.

“Every year, we see massive price loads on those items,” Glazer said. “Retailers continue to treat them as doorbuster deals that will bring in customers.”



Photo Credit: Boston Globe via Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA['Lets Not Rush This': Senators Urge Health Care Vote Delay]]>Sun, 25 Jun 2017 07:56:26 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/ronjohnsonfeuerherd.jpg

Senators on both sides of the aisle can agree on at least one thing: rushing a vote on health care would be ill-advised, NBC News reported. 

Republican senators unveiled their version of the health bill on Thursday, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has indicated he wants to see a vote before the end of this week. 

Both Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., who each have expressed serious reservations with the bill for very different reasons, said during exclusive interviews on Sunday's "Meet The Press" that rushing a vote before the July 4th recess would be unwise. 

Sanders said: "There is no way on God’s Earth that this bill should be passed this week. The people of Wisconsin don’t know what’s in it, the people of Vermont don’t know what’s in it. We need a serious discussion."



Photo Credit: J. Scott Applewhite/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Top News: Forest Fire Blazes Through Southern Spain]]>Mon, 26 Jun 2017 04:36:31 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/180*120/AP_17176670370686-sm.jpgView daily updates on the best photos in domestic and foreign news.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Poll: Dems, GOP Divided on Virginia Shooting Motivation]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 16:45:21 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/scalisesavedbypolice.jpg

Data from this month’s NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll shows that partisan identity significantly affected how Americans viewed the shooting on Republican lawmakers at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, last Wednesday.

By a 20 point margin, 52 percent to 32 percent, more Republicans than Democrats called the shooting a result of political rhetoric. A majority of Democrats — 55 percent — called it an isolated incident, while 37 percent of Republicans said the same.

The public overall was closely divided. Forty-one percent cited political rhetoric, while 46 percent said the shooting was an isolated case.

The NBC/WSJ poll was conducted June 17-20 of 900 adults — including more than 400 by cell phone — and it has an overall margin of error of plus-minus 3.3 percentage points.



Photo Credit: AP Photo/Alex Brandon]]>
<![CDATA[San Francisco to Blow Kisses to the World From Pink Triangle]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 18:19:33 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-478828198.jpg

The Pink Triangle may be a byproduct of the Holocaust, but San Francisco on Saturday will light up its iconic installation with 150 rainbow-colored kisses, effectively turning its symbolism on its head.

“We’ve totally flipped the meaning of the Pink Triangle – it’s about love and not death,” said co-founder Patrick Carney.

Obscura Digital, known for projecting lights on the Conservatory of Flowers for Summer of Love and on the Empire State Building to raise awareness about animal extinction, will help give San Francisco’s beloved homage to the LGBTQ community a real smacker during Pride 2017.

“We’ve photographed hundreds of people blowing kisses so it’s going to be kisses to the world from the Pink Triangle,” said Carney, visibly excited about the project known as “Kisses from San Francisco.”

The much-awaited light show on the Pink Triangle will be visible from nightfall through 2 a.m., said Obscura Digital.

A week that was marked by a record-breaking heat wave gave way to an overcast and gloomy Saturday, but that didn’t stop nearly 200 volunteers from flocking to the north hill of Twin Peaks.

Blanketed by Karl the Fog, they helped set up the iconic Pink Triangle, which every year honors gay people who were persecuted and slain in Nazi Germany during World War II.

“They had a series of triangles for their undesirables and pink was for the gays,” Carney said.

The Rainbow Flag was created in 1978 by artist Gilbert Baker when then-San Francisco city supervisor Harvey Milk asked his friend to use his skills to make banners for gay and anti-war street protests.

The bright colors have since become synonymous with the gay rights movement. Carney described the Rainbow Flag as “entirely new and beautiful and wonderful.”

In contrast, he said, “The Pink Triangle has a tragic history and part of acknowledging and celebrating where we are for 2017 is remembering where we’ve been.”


Seeking to add a pop of color to San Francisco’s Pride Parade, Carney remembered looking up at Twin Peaks over 22 years ago and seeing a “big, blank canvas.”

So Carney and a friend went out and bought tarp and paint. With the help of eight others, they painted it bright pink “in the dark of the night so we wouldn’t be arrested.”

Fast forward to 2017 and San Francisco police officers and elected officials were on hand to help construct the one-acre Pink Triangle, which features 175 pink tarps that are held in place with 5,000 12-inch long steel spikes.

Carney said that he didn’t expect his “renegade project” to last more than a year or two. However, after ealizing that people didn’t know the meaning or importance of the Pink Triangle, Carney came up with the idea of a yearly ceremony.

Educating people enabled the movement to pick up steam. Decades later, the Pink Triangle continues to resonate.

“Especially in this administration, we’re not sure what’s going to happen with our rights,” Carney admitted. “We’ve had a lot of gains in recent years, but in some states they’re trying to roll back or ignore those gains.”

This year, he said, the Pink Triangle symbolizes resistance from its perch on the highest point of San Francisco, which can be seen for 20 miles away on a clear day, according to Carney.

It’s “barrels of fun,” Carney said.

The Pink Triangle will overlook downtown San Francisco and the Castro district through Sunday evening. Volunteers are needed to break it down between 4:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. More information is available online.




Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[1 Dead After Plane Crashes Into Fla. Day Care Building]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 21:09:36 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/19399006_1598925693453449_1920677633345009367_n.jpg

A plane carrying two people crashed into a day care building in Fort Myers, Florida, and killed one of the passengers, police said.

A Piper PA-28 aircraft went down during an attempted takeoff at Page Field, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. The crash happened shortly before 8 a.m. Saturday morning at Chico's Early Education Center campus, directly across from the Metro Commerce Center along Metro Parkway.

Port Authority spokesperson Victoria Moreland told NBC affiliate WBBH that no one was inside the building when the plane crashed into it.

Witnesses told WBBH that the plane clipped some trees before crashing into the daycare building. Smoke billowed up from the plane.

The surviving passenger of the plane was injured, according to the Lee County Sheriff's Office. No other information was immediately available about the person's condition.

The Federal Aviation Administration said they plan to investigate the incident. 



Photo Credit: John Ballard]]>
<![CDATA[Frozen Chicken Bites for Toddlers Recalled After Bones Found]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 20:42:50 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/178*120/Screen+Shot+2017-06-24+at+11.18.14+PM.png

Chicken bites intended for toddlers are being recalled from stores nationwide after bones were found, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in a statement Saturday.

More than 54,000 pounds of chicken bites of California-based Overhill Farms are being recalled for the potential threat. There are no reports of illness or injury, but it is Class I recall with a "high" health risk.

The affected frozen chicken bites were produced on Aug. 30, 2016, Feb. 1, 2017, Feb. 9, 2017 and April 25, 2017. It involves 3-ounce, "yummy spoonful" boxes intended for young kids and 30-pound bulk cases of chicken bites that come with broccoli, carrot or sweet potato.

The FSIS is urging consumers who have the affected products not to consume them. They should be discarded or returned to the place of purchase. 

The full list of affected Overhill Farms products in this recall can be viewed here



Photo Credit: FSIS]]>
<![CDATA[Donald Trump's Presidency in Photos]]>Mon, 22 May 2017 13:02:55 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/dgaf-2.jpgTake a look at significant events from President Donald Trump's time in office, including the signing of the travel ban, Neil Gorsuch's appointment to the Supreme Court, the launch of 59 missiles at Syria's government-held Shayrat Airfiled and more.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Police Searches Drop in States That Legalized Marijuana]]>Fri, 23 Jun 2017 20:36:17 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/generic-pot-smoke-weed-marijuana-smoke.jpg

Traffic searches by highway patrols in Colorado and Washington dropped by nearly half after the two states legalized marijuana in 2012, NBC News reported.

In Colorado, the change occurred gradually, with searches dropping initially by 30 percent, and then flatting out to a more than 50-percent drop within a year.

In Washington, there was a drop of more than 50 percent in searches within three months of legalization. The search rate remained low thereafter. The 12 states in the Stanford study that did not pass marijuana decriminalization legislation during the period did not experience significant drops.

The drop in searches also reduced the racial disparities in the stops, according to a new analysis of police data, but not by much. Latino and Black Americans are still searched at higher rates than whites.



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<![CDATA[Trump WH Has Taken Little Action to Stop Next Election Hack]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 03:31:09 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-632915364.jpg

The Trump administration has taken little meaningful action to prevent Russian hacking, leaking and disruption in the next national election in 2018, despite warnings from intelligence officials that it will happen again, officials and experts told NBC News.

Former FBI Director James Comey recently told senators during Congressional testimony that Trump never asked him about how to stop a future Russian election cyberattack. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who sits on the National Security Council, testified that he has not received a classified briefing on Russian election interference.

Dozens of state officials told NBC News they have received little direction from Washington about election security. White House spokesman Sean Spicer said this week he had never addressed the matter with Trump.

That apparent indifference, coupled with a failure to fill key federal agency jobs, has resulted in a government paralyzed by inaction when it comes to protecting the next election, experts and government officials told NBC News.



Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images]]>