Cleveland Shooting Highlights Facebook’s Responsibility in Policing Depraved Videos | NBC Bay Area
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Cleveland Shooting Highlights Facebook’s Responsibility in Policing Depraved Videos

The site has been making adjustments to try to deal with criminal incidents and suicides

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Cleveland Shooting Highlights Facebook’s Responsibility in Policing Depraved Videos
    Getty Images, File
    The Facebook logo is displayed at the Facebook Innovation Hub in this February 24, 2016, file photo in Berlin, Germany.

    Steve Stephens' shooting of a random man on Easter Sunday has reignited the debate on how to better police criminal content on Facebook Live, NBC News reported.

    The tool has been available for just one year, but Facebook already has run into issues because of it, as people have used the application to broadcast themselves committing gruesome crimes.

    In Chicago, a man was tortured on Facebook live, while in Sweden, a gang rape was reportedly broadcast on the application. Suicides have also been shown on Facebook Live.

    Facebook’s protocol for dealing with Facebook Live includes having a team on call at all hours to respond to reports of content that may violate the site’s community standards.  

    Man Visits Disneyland 2,000 Times In a Row

    [NATL] Man Visits Disneyland 2,000 Times In a Row

    A Huntington Beach man has set a record for most consecutive visits to Disneyland. Jeff Reitz, 44, has visited the park 2,000 times in a row. Reitz started visiting the park every day when he was unemployed and wanted to keep his spirits up. Employed at the VA now, Reitz continues to visit every day after work because it helps him to decompress after a long day. His favorite ride is the Matterhorn Bobsleds, which he first rode with his mom when he was 2 years old. 

    (Published 2 hours ago)

    On Monday, Facebook issued a statement online about Sunday's shooting, addressing how it handled the situation, along with a timeline of events, starting with when the first video "of intent to murder" was uploaded. In the statement, Facebook also said it is working to improve its reporting flows.