Nike's 'Premier Slam' Dress Just Doesn't Do It for Some at Wimbledon | NBC Bay Area
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Nike's 'Premier Slam' Dress Just Doesn't Do It for Some at Wimbledon

Some players have also complained it gets in the way during plays

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images
    Katie Swan of Great Britain plays a backhand during the Ladies Singles first round match against Timea Bacsinszky of Switzerland on day two of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 28, 2016 in London, England. Swan, who was wearing the controversial Nike "Premiere Slam," had to tuck the dress into her shorts during the match.

    Nike has come under fire over the tennis dress it designed for its sponsored female athletes at this year's Wimbledon tournament.

    The Championships at the All-England Club started Monday, and the dress named "Premier Slam" immediately courted controversy after players were spotted wearing them.

    The dress, retailing for $100 on Nike's website, is standard Wimbledon white, but its loose fit and length has some players and fans complaining it reveals too much. Some players have also complained that the dress flies above the waist and gets in the way during plays, NBC's  "Today" show reported.

    During qualifying rounds, Britain’s Katie Boulter used a headband as an impromptu belt to try to keep the dress in place. 

    German player Sabine Lisicki, speaking at a press conference Tuesday after her 6-1, 6-3 win over Shelby Rogers, said she didn't feel comfortable "showing that much" and opted to wear a more conventional skirt-and-shirt set.

    "For me, the most important thing is to feel comfortable and not to think about anything, and with this I feel great," Lisicki added.

    But not all players were concerned with the mini. Eugenie Bouchard posted a photo of herself in the garb, with the caption "Short & Sweet." 

    Short & sweet �� @nikecourt #stealtheshow

    A photo posted by Genie Bouchard (@geniebouchard) on

    According to "Today," Nike has set up an alterations shop at Wimbledon so that players can make adjustments to their dress.

    In a statement to "Today" Nike spokesman Matthew Kneller said the alterations are not part of a "recall" to the dress.

    "The product has not been recalled and we often customize products and make alterations for athletes as they compete. We work closely with our athletes to provide them with product that helps them perform and feel their best on the court," Kneller wrote.

    Wimbledon's famously strict dress code — which defines white as not inclusive of "cream or off-white" — does not specify a length for female players' skirts or dresses, only that it adhere to "common standards of decency."