Robot Allows Boy With Degenerative Disease to Go to School | NBC Bay Area
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Robot Allows Boy With Degenerative Disease to Go to School

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    Despite a degenerative disease that makes going to school a life-threatening situation, a 3-year-old Maryland boy attends classes every day thanks to technology. Chris Gordon reports.

    (Published Friday, March 24, 2017)

    Despite a degenerative disease that makes going to school a life-threatening situation, a three-year-old Maryland boy attends classes every day thanks to technology allowing him to connect with his classmates, make friends and even join them for lunch.

    Max Lasko and his mother operate a Beam telepresence robot from home, several miles from school.

    “When Max first started, every time Max would beam in on the robot, they would be really excited and yell, ‘It's the robot! It's the robot!’” teacher Allyson Levine said. “But after about a week or two, it became, ‘Max is here.’”

    Max was born with spinal muscular atrophy, which makes it difficult for him to move, breathe and eat. He can’t be in a classroom for fear of catching a cold or flu, which could be life-threatening for him.

    “We felt that it was really important -- since Max's cognition is fully intact, his social intelligence is fully intact -- we wanted him to be able to interact with his peers but we wanted to do so safely,” said his mother, Kristen Lasko.

    Max's mother is a teacher, and his father, Jonathan Lasko, is a computer scientist. They applied for and won a grant to cover the costs of the robot, and they asked the Bender Jewish Community Center in Rockville to accept Max into class.

    “What our role is is just to be accepting of everyone,” said Ora Cohen Rosenfeld, head of the Bender JCC Early Childhood Center. “And I think this is teaching our children to see Max as a child just as they are with the same needs. He’s different and yet he's very much the same.”

    Max is on a ventilator, and his mother puts "angel arms" on him so he can move his hands and participate in activities like coloring for a friend’s birthday picture book.

    Max vocalizes but lacks strength for articulation. His mother understands everything he says.

    Asked what he wants to be when he grows up, Max surprised his mother when he replied he wants to be a teacher like she is.

    “A teacher?” his mother reacted. “You want to be a teacher? I didn’t know that. Wow.”

    “I’m glad he has these teachers as role models,” Jonathan Lasko said. “He's looking ahead and imagining himself in the role of teacher, and just like any of us, he's not going to let his different abilities get in the way of doing what he is passionate about.”