'We Need a Justice Dept., Not an Obstruction-of-Justice Dept.': Sen. Warren | NBC Bay Area
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

'We Need a Justice Dept., Not an Obstruction-of-Justice Dept.': Sen. Warren

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    President Donald Trump referenced Elizabeth Warren in his speech to the NRA on Friday.

    (Published Friday, April 28, 2017)

    U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren has taken a jab at President Donald Trump while urging University of Massachusetts-Amherst graduates to pursue issues they care about.

    During Friday's commencement address, Warren ticked off a list of possible causes, including student debt, access to voting and "the principle that no one, no one in this country is above the law and we need a Justice Department, not an obstruction-of-justice department."

    That last suggestion received big cheers. It was a reference to Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, whose agency is investigating allegations of collaboration between Russia and the Trump presidential campaign last year.

    Warren, first elected in 2012, told the students America needs them and how "each generation must rebuild democracy to serve its own time and its own needs."

    In Surprise Move, Trump Fires FBI's Comey

    [NATL] In Surprise Move, Trump Fires FBI's Comey

    President Trump has fired FBI director James Comey. In a letter, Trump said that Comey is "not able to effectively lead the bureau." The Attorney General and his Deputy recommended the move, saying that Comey "was mistaken" going public about the Clinton email investigation.

    Democrats - many of whom said they'd also lost faith in Comey - are outraged now that he was fired while investigating Russian ties to President Trump. "It's pretty clear what's going on here: Donald Trump doesn't want anyone coming any place close to an active investigation," said Senator Elizabeth Warren.

    FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe is taking over for now.

    (Published Wednesday, May 10, 2017)