Dave Cortese, Sam Liccardo to Face Off For SJ Mayor

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Santa Clara County Supervisor Dave Cortese and San Jose Councilman Sam Liccardo will face each other in a runoff election in November to be mayor of San Jose. Marianne Favro reports. (Published Wednesday, Jun 4, 2014)

    Santa Clara County Supervisor Dave Cortese and San Jose Councilman Sam Liccardo will face each other in a runoff election in November to be mayor of San Jose.

    Cortese garnered more than 33 percent of city voters for mayor to Liccardo's 25 percent.

    Dave Cortese, Sam Liccardo to Face Off For SJ Mayor

    [BAY] Dave Cortese, Sam Liccardo to Face Off For SJ Mayor
    Santa Clara County Supervisor Dave Cortese and San Jose Councilman Sam Liccardo will face each other in a runoff election in November to be mayor of San Jose. Cortese garnered more than 33 percent of city voters for mayor to Liccardo's 25 percent. Kris Sanches reports. (Published Wednesday, Jun 4, 2014)

    Cortese, a former San Jose councilman and vice mayor who has two years remaining in his second term as supervisor, has pitched a "three point plan" to beef-up the city's police patrols, suppress street gangs and bring residents, businesses and schools together to resolve problems. He also advocates city-run homework centers and reading programs.


    Liccardo, a one-time county deputy district attorney who relinquished his District 3 seat to run for mayor, said he wants to cut wasteful spending, reform city employee pensions, hire 200 more police officers, improve response times to medical emergencies, repair roads, reduce homelessness and have longer school days in San Jose.

    The other top vote-getters for mayor were San Jose Vice Mayor Madison Nguyen with 21 percent, San Jose City Councilman Pierluigi Oliverio at almost 10 percent and Councilwoman Rose Herrera with a bit above 6 percent. Oliverio and Herrera are now out of the race.

     Nguyen gave up her District 7 seat to be a mayoral candidate.

    Oliverio, who represents District 6, and Herrera, of District 8, are not up for re-election and will remain on the council.

    Six candidates who finished first and second in the balloting for the open seats in City Council Districts 1, 3, and 7 will also face off that day.