Tech Helps Make Stanford the New "It" School

New York Times declares Bay Area institution America's hottest college

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    File image of the Stanford campus.

    Stanford is in.

    A focus on technology and its fortuitious position in the middle of Silicon Valley means that Stanford University -- and not Harvard, nor Yale, nor any other ivy-covered institution -- is the country's most sought-after college.

    Stanford has the nation's lowest acceptance rate, it's the Princeton Review's "dream college" among high school seniors with lofty goals, and its donors pour money into its coffers.

    The New York Times, in weighing Stanford's values, notes that the West Coast college has a focus on science and engineering, two fields of study highly coveted in the tech job market, that Harvard and other Ivies lack.

    Over a quarter of Stanford graduates major in either computer science or engineering, and 90 percent of Stanford undergraduates take at least one computer programming class, the newspaper reported.

    The allure of Stanford is no doubt linked to its proximity to the gold fields of Google, Facebook, Apple and other tech titans. So much so, in fact, that "administrators and professors [at Stanford] have voiced concerns that too much of its appeal is based on students' hopes of striking it rich in Silicon Valley."

    In other words: If you want to study English, you might want to go somewhere else.