The Dark Side of CES

CES isn't just gadgets and glamor, there is also some real pain

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer stands near Slate computers as he delivers the pre-show keynote to kick off the 2010 International Consumer Electronics Show at the Las Vegas Hilton January 6, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada. CES, the world's largest annual consumer technology tradeshow.

    On the second day of CES, the tech gods gave to me: one sore throat, two swollen eyes, three heal blisters, and a football courtesy of the Intel Lenovo sponsored party from the previous night. 

    However, there was an entire portion of the trade show floor that I hadn't’t even glanced at yet, so I couldn’t let traces of the classic convention cold keep me from taking another journey through the electronic abyss. 

    After taking in some digital eye candy at the LG booth, I headed toward the NBC Universal stage and viewed a live web cast of the popular Revision3 tech review show “Tekzilla,” co-hosted by Patrick Norton and Veronica Belmont.  I was able to steal some time on the sidelines with them, as they each described their 2010 CES favorites. 

     


    It’s smaller tech firms, such as the social eBook creator Copia that Belmont says stood out the most to her this year, while announcements from the big players lacked luster.

     


    Mr. Norton however, took a liking to some shiny screens and lenses displayed by some of the larger companies.

     

     


    In the early evening, I hit the ultimate blogger destination party It Won’t Stay in Vegas at the Atomic Testing Museum.  With a party title like that, how could I resist?

    Star Trek: The Next Generation” stars Brent Spiner and LeVar Burton were featured guests, and were swarmed by eager techies getting their geek on and vying for photo ops.

    The highlight of the event for me was playing with Parrot.com’s utterly fantastic Quadricopter, and finally getting to interview tech evangelist, author, and renowned Bay Area blogger Robert Scoble, better-known as Scobleizer.

    A handful of people waited patiently in line to pick Scobleizer’s brain, as he discussed the purpose and benefits of attending CES.

     


    With 3DTV on the tip of everyone’s tongue this year, I had to get his take on all the hype. 

     


    As far as where devices are headed, he says it’s all about interconnectivity.