<![CDATA[NBC Bay Area - News as seen on - $cms.content.title]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcbayarea.com/on-air/as-seen-onen-usTue, 25 Jul 2017 03:53:48 -0700Tue, 25 Jul 2017 03:53:48 -0700NBC Local Integrated Media<![CDATA[GOP Gearing Up for Health Care Vote With McCain Back in DC]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 03:52:52 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/AP_17115626469653.jpg

Republican leaders are steering the Senate toward a crucial vote on their bill eviscerating much of President Barack Obama's health care law, buoyed by the near theatrical return to the Capitol of the ailing Sen. John McCain.

No stranger to heroic episodes, the Navy pilot who persevered through five years of captivity during the Vietnam War announced through his office that he would be back in Washington for the critical roll call on beginning debate on the legislation. The 80-year-old has been at home in Arizona since he revealed last week that he's undergoing treatment for brain cancer, but a one-sentence statement said he "looks forward" to returning for work on health care and other legislation.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., scheduled the initial health care vote for Tuesday. It seemed unlikely Republicans would bring McCain cross country if they didn't think his vote would make a difference, and his mere presence could make it harder for wavering Republicans to cast a vote against even considering the bill.

Democrats uniformly oppose the effort to tear down Obama's signature legislative achievement. Republicans control the chamber 52-48, meaning they can afford to lose just two Republicans with McCain around and only one in his absence. Vice President Mike Pence would cast a tie-breaking vote.

At least a dozen GOP senators have openly said they oppose or criticized McConnell's legislation, which he's revised as he's hunted Republican support. While it had long seemed headed toward defeat, Republicans Monday began showing glimmers of optimism.

"My mandate from the people of Kentucky is to vote yes, and I certainly intend to do so," McConnell said Monday in what seemed an implicit reminder to his Republican colleagues that they've done the same.

As usual, President Donald Trump was blunter.

"Over and over again, they said, 'Repeal and replace, repeal and replace.' But they can now keep their promise," Trump said of GOP senators in White House remarks.

On Tuesday, Trump referenced the health care vote during a tweetstorm that earlier criticized his attorney general and acting FBI director for not taking action against election opponent Hillary Clinton. 

"Big day for HealthCare. After 7 years of talking, we will soon see whether or not Republicans are willing to step up to the plate!" he wrote. "ObamaCare is torturing the American People.The Democrats have fooled the people long enough. Repeal or Repeal & Replace! I have pen in hand."

During last year's campaign Trump ridiculed McCain over his years as a POW during the Vietnam War. But he praised the senator Tuesday, tweeting, "So great that John McCain is coming back to vote. Brave - American hero! Thank you John."

Senators and aides said talks were continuing that might win over enough Republicans to commence debate. The discussions were covering issues including potentially giving states more leeway to use federal funds to help people losing coverage under Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor, disabled and nursing home patients.

Should Tuesday's vote fail, it would be an unalloyed embarrassment for a party that finally gained control of the White House, Senate and House in January but still fell flat on its promise to uproot Obamacare. Republicans could try returning to the bill later this year if they somehow round up more support.

Should the initial motion win, that would prompt 20 hours of debate and countless amendments in a battle likely to last all week. Moderate and conservative Republicans would try reshaping the bill in their direction while Democrats would attempt to force GOP senators to cast difficult votes aimed at haunting them in re-election campaigns.

Even then, the measure's ultimate fate still seemed iffy because of GOP divisions.

Obama's law was enacted in 2010 over unanimous Republican opposition. Since then, its expansion of Medicaid and creation of federal insurance marketplaces has produced 20 million fewer uninsured people. It's also provided protections that require insurers to provide robust coverage to all, cap consumers' annual and lifetime expenditures and ensure that people with serious medical conditions pay the same premiums as the healthy.

The law has been unpopular with GOP voters and the party has launched numerous attempts to dismantle the statute. All until this year were mere aspirations because Obama vetoed every major one that reached him.

Ever since 2010, Republicans have been largely united on scuttling the statute but divided over how to replace it.

Those divides sharpened with Trump willing to sign legislation and estimates by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office that several GOP bills would cause more than 20 million people to become uninsured by 2026. Polls showing growing popularity for Obama's law and abysmal approval ratings for the GOP effort haven't helped.

The House approved its version of the bill in May after several setbacks. It's similar to the Senate measure McConnell unveiled in June after writing it privately. But he's also revised it in his hunt for GOP votes.

McConnell's bill would abolish much of Obama's law, eliminating its tax penalties on people not buying policies, cutting Medicaid, eliminating its tax boosts on medical companies and providing less generous health care subsidies for consumers.

Moderate Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, has remained opposed to beginning debate on any option McConnell has revealed so far. Conservative Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., said he would vote no unless leaders agreed to an early vote on simply repealing Obama's statute and giving Congress two years to replace it.

Conservatives were seeking language letting insurers offer bare-bones policies with low premiums, which would be illegal under Obama's law. Moderates from states whose low-income residents rely heavily on Medicaid were resisting the GOP bill's cuts in that program.

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[McCain's Return Symbolic for Health Care Vote: Analysis]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 03:48:03 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/479775710-John-McCain.jpg

At the twilight of a storied career and battling a brain tumor, Sen. John McCain stands poised to deliver for his party and his president on the issue that's defined the GOP for the past seven years.

It's a situation heavy with drama and symbolism. The 80-year-old Arizona senator will return to Washington just days after a cancer diagnosis, to cast what could be the deciding vote Tuesday to open debate on legislation to repeal and replace "Obamacare."

McCain himself campaigned heavily on the "Obamacare" repeal issue last year as he won re-election to a sixth and almost certainly final Senate term. And there could be sweet revenge in defying cancer to undo the signature legislation of the man who beat him for the presidency in 2008, Barack Obama.

The Arizona senator would also deliver a key victory to President Donald Trump, despite emerging as one of the president's most outspoken GOP critics on Capitol Hill. During last year's campaign Trump shockingly ridiculed McCain over his years as a POW during the Vietnam War.

"So great that John McCain is coming back to vote. Brave - American hero! Thank you John," Trump tweeted Tuesday morning.

The situation was eerily reminiscent of a similar scenario involving McCain's good friend, the late Democratic Sen. Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts, who returned to the Senate in July 2008 while battling brain cancer to vote on Medicare legislation, his dramatic entry in the chamber eliciting cheers and applause. Kennedy died of cancer in August 2009.

The possibility of McCain returning had been discussed around the Capitol on Monday, yet the press release from his office late in the day came as a surprise. Nor did it guarantee success on Tuesday's vote for Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who is managing a balky GOP caucus with almost no room for error in the closely divided Senate.

"Senator McCain looks forward to returning to the United States Senate tomorrow to continue working on important legislation, including health care reform, the National Defense Authorization Act, and new sanctions on Russia, Iran and North Korea," his office said.

McCain has not been overly enthusiastic about the GOP health bill or the partisan process through which it's emerged. After an earlier version was poised to fail, he called on McConnell to reopen the process with a bipartisan approach, advice the majority leader ignored.

But McCain's best friend in the Senate Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, and other colleagues who've spoken with McCain of late, say he's been itching to get back to the Senate, impatient to return to work. And he's expected to support McConnell and Trump and vote to move forward with the GOP health bill.

"I have a feeling if there's any way he can be back he'll be here, whether or not his doctors like it, knowing John," Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said earlier Monday.

And sure enough, he will.

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Kushner Returning for 2nd Day of Questions on Russia Ties]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 03:21:09 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/kushner-speech.jpg

President Donald Trump's son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner will return to Capitol Hill Tuesday for a second day of private meetings with congressional investigators, this time for a closed-door conversation with lawmakers on the House Intelligence Committee.

Kushner on Monday answered questions from staff on the Senate's intelligence panel, acknowledging four meetings with Russians during and after Trump's victorious White House bid and insisting he had "nothing to hide." He emerged smiling to publicly declare, "All of my actions were proper."

Ahead of Kushner's meeting with the House committee, Trump took to Twitter early Tuesday to shift the focus of the conversation about the presidential campaign.

"Ukrainian efforts to sabotage Trump campaign - "quietly working to boost Clinton." So where is the investigation A.G." the president tweeted.

"Attorney General Jeff Sessions has taken a VERY weak position on Hillary Clinton crimes (where are E-mails & DNC server) & Intel leakers!" Trump continued on Twitter, adding to his criticism of Attorney General Jeff Sessions in recent days. 

A quiet insider who generally avoids the spotlight, Kushner is the first top Trump lieutenant to be quizzed by the congressional investigators probing Russia's meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Hours before the Senate meeting, Kushner released an 11-page statement that was billed as his remarks to both the Senate and House committees. In it, he acknowledged his Russian contacts during the campaign and then the following weeks, in which he served as a liaison between the transition and foreign governments. He described each contact as either insignificant or routine and he said the meetings, along with several others, were omitted from his security clearance form because of an aide's error. Kushner cast himself as a political novice learning in real time to juggle "thousands of meetings and interactions" in a fast-paced campaign.

"Let me be very clear," Kushner said afterward in a rare public statement at the White House. "I did not collude with Russia, nor do I know of anyone else in the campaign who did so."

Kushner's statement was the first detailed defense from a campaign insider responding to the controversy that has all but consumed the first six months of Trump's presidency. U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that Russia sought to tip the 2016 campaign in Trump's favor. Congressional committees, as well as a Justice Department special counsel, are investigating whether Trump associates coordinated with Russia in that effort and whether the president has sought to hamper the investigations.

Kushner said Monday he "will continue to cooperate as I have nothing to hide."

Trump watched on TV as Kushner made his appearance outside the West Wing and "thought Jared did a great job," said White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders. She said his House testimony on Tuesday would show "what a hoax this entire thing is."

Trump also took aim at the top Democrat on the House intelligence panel, California Rep. Adam Schiff, calling him "sleazy" in a tweet and saying he "spends all of his time on television." Schiff said on CBS's "Face the Nation" Sunday that he has a "great many questions" for Kushner.

Schiff responded Monday by tweeting that Trump watches TV too often and his "comments and actions are beneath the dignity of the office."

In the statement for the two committees, Kushner provided for the first time his recollection of a meeting at Trump Tower with a Russian lawyer who was said to have damaging information about Trump's Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Emails released this month show that the president's son, Donald Trump Jr., accepted the meeting with the idea that he would receive information as part of a Russian government effort to help Trump's campaign. But Kushner said he hadn't seen those emails until recently shown them by his lawyers.

He called the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya such a "waste of time" that he asked his assistant to call him out of the gathering. He says he arrived late and when he heard the lawyer discussing the issue of international adoptions, he texted his assistant to call him out.

"No part of the meeting I attended included anything about the campaign; there was no follow-up to the meeting that I am aware of; I do not recall how many people were there (or their names), and I have no knowledge of any documents being offered or accepted," he said.

Kushner also confirmed earlier media reports that he had suggested using Russian diplomatic facilities to set up secure communications between Trump adviser Michael Flynn, who would become Trump's national security adviser, and Russian officials. But he disputed that it was an effort to establish a "secret back channel."

His statement describes a December meeting with Flynn and Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in which Kushner and Kislyak discussed establishing a secure line for the Trump transition team and Moscow to communicate about policy in Syria.

Kushner said that when Kislyak asked if there was a secure way for him to provide information from his "generals," Kushner suggested using facilities at the Russian Embassy.

"The ambassador said that would not be possible and so we all agreed that we would receive this information after the Inauguration. Nothing else occurred," the statement said.

Kushner said he never proposed an ongoing secret form of communication.

He also acknowledged meeting with a Russian banker, Sergey Gorkov, at the request of Kislyak but said no specific policies were discussed.

As for his application for a security clearance, Kushner said his form was submitted prematurely due to a miscommunication with his assistant, who had believed the document was complete.

He said he mistakenly omitted all of his foreign contacts, not just his meetings with Russians, and has worked in the past six months with the FBI to correct the record.

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP]]>
<![CDATA['Late Night': Jane Lynch Travels With Everything in Her Bra]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 01:04:07 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Screen-Shot-2017-07-25-at-4.04.46-AM.jpg

Seth Meyers chats with Jane Lynch, who shows off her special hack for carrying items while traveling.]]>
<![CDATA['Late Night': A Look at Kushner's Statement on Russia Ties]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 01:00:13 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Screen-Shot-2017-07-25-at-4.00.52-AM.jpg

Seth Meyers takes a look at the recent statements by Jared Kushner, President Donald Trump's son-in-law- and senior advisor, who said he "did not collude" with Russia.]]>
<![CDATA['Tonight': Metz Had 81 Cents When She Joined 'This Is Us']]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 00:47:32 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Screen-Shot-2017-07-25-at-3.46.30-AM.jpg

Jimmy Fallon chats with Chrissy Metz, who shares how she didn't even have enough money to get gas on her way to audition for "This Is Us." ]]>
<![CDATA['Tonight': Best Son Challenge With Rob Lowe]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 00:43:46 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Screen-Shot-2017-07-25-at-3.44.30-AM.jpg

Jimmy Fallon asks Rob Lowe's sons Matthew and John Owen a series of random questions about their dad to determine which son knows him best.]]>
<![CDATA[Rob’s Forecast: Hotter Temps Return Soon]]>Tue, 25 Jul 2017 00:06:24 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Robs_Forecast_Hotter_Temps_return.jpg

A deep marine layer to near 2,000’ feet coupled with steady onshore winds will keep our temps on the mild side for another day. We’ll likely see some drizzle at times into the morning commute before skies begin clearing east of the Golden Gate Bridge by mid-morning. High pressure will build back toward Northern California for the second half of the week leading to another late week into weekend warmup with valley temps set to climb into the 90s again.]]>
<![CDATA[Calif. Woman Arrested in Deadly Crash Livestreamed]]>Mon, 24 Jul 2017 23:57:07 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Calif._Woman_Arrested_in_Deadly_Crash_Livestreamed.jpg

An 18-year old woman has been arrested in California on suspicion of causing a deadly crash that she recorded live on Instagram. Ian Cull reports.]]>
<![CDATA[Former VP Al Gore Discusses New Global Warming Film in SF]]>Mon, 24 Jul 2017 23:53:54 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/al+gore-0724.jpg

Former Vice President Al Gore was in San Francisco on Monday to promote his new movie on the threat of global warming. Thom Jensen reports.

Photo Credit: NBC Bay Area]]>