<![CDATA[NBC Bay Area - News as seen on - $cms.content.title]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcbayarea.com/on-air/as-seen-onen-usSat, 25 Mar 2017 01:11:50 -0700Sat, 25 Mar 2017 01:11:50 -0700NBC Local Integrated Media<![CDATA[More Big Brands Pull Ads From YouTube]]>Sat, 25 Mar 2017 00:58:13 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/AP_142450164879.jpg

An advertising boycott of YouTube is broadening, a sign that big-spending companies doubt Google's ability to prevent marketing campaigns from appearing alongside repugnant videos.

PepsiCo, Wal-Mart Stores and Starbucks on Friday confirmed that they have also suspended their advertising on YouTube after the Wall Street Journal found Google's automated programs placed their brands on five videos containing racist content. AT&T, Verizon, Johnson & Johnson, Volkswagen and several other companies pulled ads earlier this week.

The defections are continuing even after Google apologized for tainting brands and outlined steps to ensure ads don't appear alongside unsavory videos.

It's not an easy problem to fix, even for a company with the brainpower that Google has drawn upon to build a search engine that billions trust to find the information they want in a matter of seconds.

Google depends mostly on automated programs to place ads in YouTube videos because the job is too much for humans to handle on their own. About 400 hours of video is now posted on YouTube each minute.

The company has pledged to hire more people to review videos and develop even more sophisticated programs to teach its computers to figure out which clips would be considered to be too despicable for advertising.

Contacted Friday, Google stood by its earlier promise, signaling the company's confidence that it will be able to placate advertisers. As part of that effort, Google intends to block more objectionable videos from ever being posted on YouTube — an effort that could spur complaints about censorship.

Some outraged advertisers are making it clear that they won't return to YouTube until they are certain Google has the situation under control.

"The content with which we are being associated is appalling and completely against our company values," Wal-Mart said in a Friday statement.

Besides suspending their spending on YouTube, Wal-Mart, PepsiCo and several other companies have said they will stop buying ads that Google places on more than two million other third-party websites.

If Google can't lure back advertisers, it could result in a loss of hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue. Most analysts, though, doubt the ad boycott will seriously hurt Google's corporate parent, Alphabet Inc.

Although they have been growing rapidly, YouTube's ads still only represent a relatively small financial piece of Alphabet, whose revenue totaled $73.5 billion last year after subtracting commissions paid to Google's partners. YouTube accounted for $5.6 billion, or nearly 8 percent, of that total, based on estimates from the research firm eMarketer Inc.

At most, RBC Capital Markets analyst Mark Mahaney said he expects the YouTube ad boycott to trim Alphabet's net revenue by about 2 percent this year.

Moody's Investor Service predicted the backlash won't last long because Google is "laser-focused" on cleaning things up on YouTube.

Alphabet's stock price has fallen nearly 4 percent since the boycott began last week after an investigation by The Times in London revealed the ads of major brands were appearing in YouTube videos delving into contentious themes. The shares fell $4.51 to close at $835.14 Friday.

AP Technology Writer Mae Anderson in New York contributed to this story.

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: Danny Moloshok, AP (File)]]>
<![CDATA[US Judge Grants Asylum to Singapore Teen Blogger]]>Sat, 25 Mar 2017 00:29:42 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Singapore-teen-blogger.jpg

A teenage blogger from Singapore whose online posts blasting his government landed in him jail was granted asylum to remain in the United States, an immigration judge in Chicago ruled Friday.

Amos Yee has been detained by federal immigration authorities since December when he was taken into custody at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. Attorneys said the 18-year-old could be released from a Wisconsin detention center as early as Monday.

Judge Samuel Cole issued a 13-page decision more than two weeks after Yee's closed-door hearing on the asylum application.

"Yee has met his burden of showing that he suffered past persecution on account of his political opinion and has a well-founded fear of future persecution in Singapore," Cole wrote.

Yee left Singapore with the intention of seeking asylum in the U.S. after being jailed for several weeks in 2015 and 2016. He was accused of hurting the religious feelings of Muslims and Christians in the multiethnic city-state; Yee is an atheist. However, many of his blog and social media posts criticized Singapore's leaders. He created controversy in 2015 as the city-state was mourning the death of its first prime minister and he posted an expletive-laden video about Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew just after his death.

Such open criticism of political leaders is discouraged in Singapore. The case, which raised questions about free speech and censorship, has been closely watched abroad.

Cole said testimony during Yee's hearing showed that while the Singapore government's stated reason for punishing him involved religion, "its real purpose was to stifle Yee's political speech." He said Yee's prison sentence was "unusually long and harsh" especially for his age.

Officials at Singapore's embassy in Washington, D.C., have not addressed the case and messages left for the government on Saturday morning in Singapore weren't immediately returned.

The ruling was praised by others.

"I think this is a major embarrassment for the government, that all along claimed Amos' persecution was not political," Kenneth Jeyaretnam, an opposition politician who gave testimony supporting Yee's asylum, told The Associated Press.

Jeyaretnam said the decision "may create waves in Singapore. It may show Singaporeans that there's nothing to be afraid about. The Singapore government is a paper tiger. We don't have to swallow the brainwashing that is constantly put out."

His father, the late J.B. Jeyaretnam, attained folklore stature in the country's politics and was bankrupted after contesting a series of lawsuits by the ruling People's Action Party.

PAP has dominated national politics since Singapore's independence in 1965 and its detractors often were taken to court on defamation or other charges.

U.S.-based Human Rights Watch applauded the asylum decision and expressed hope the decision would not be appealed.

"Singapore excels at creating a pressure cooker environment for dissidents and free thinkers who dare challenge the political, economic and social diktats from the ruling People's Action Party. It's clear the Singapore government saw Amos Yee as the proverbial nail sticking up that had to be hammered down," said a statement from Phil Robertson, HRW's deputy Asia director.

Yee's attorney Sandra Grossman said her client was elated with the news.

"He's very excited to begin new life in the United States," Grossman said.

Yee told the AP in a phone interview from jail this month that he feared returning to Singapore. But he said he'd continue to speak out and had already planned a line of T-shirts and started writing a book about his experiences.

"I have an infinite amount of ideas of what to do," he told the AP.

Department of Homeland Security attorneys had opposed the asylum bid, saying Yee's case didn't qualify as persecution based on political beliefs. It was unclear whether they'd appeal the decision or if Yee would have to remain imprisoned if they did. Attorneys have 30 days to appeal.

Officials with DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement didn't immediately return messages Friday. A spokeswoman for the Executive Office for Immigration Review, which oversees U.S. immigration courts, declined comment.

Associated Press writer Annabelle Liang in Singapore contributed to this report.

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: Wong Maye-E, AP (File)]]>
<![CDATA[David West Is Coming Up Big for the Warriors]]>Sat, 25 Mar 2017 00:16:29 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/david-west-kings-warriors.jpg

OAKLAND -- David West is as much a cleanup man as he is a basketball player.

The veteran power forward, masquerading as a center for the Warriors, cleans up behind teammates, cleans the clocks of opponents and probably cleans his plate after every meal. And he'd hit fourth in any manager's batting order.

The Warriors during their renaissance haven't had such a personality. They've been a fun bunch, enjoying life, each other and their pillaging of the NBA.

West, 36, brings a more laconic dynamic, and it's on full display as the Warriors lean into the final weeks of this regular season. He's a leader who is producing and, more and more, winning over a fan base that was somewhat skeptical early this season.

"David West has been playing brilliantly," Warriors coach Steve Kerr said Friday night, after West came off the bench for a highly efficient 14-minute stint in a 114-100 win over the Kings.

Showcasing sharp passing, splendid shooting, solid rim protection and his usual old-jerky toughness, West totaled 8 points, four assists, three rebounds, three blocks and one steal. The Warriors were plus-8 when he was on the floor.

Such production, it seems, is a bit of a bonus.

"He's been very good for us as a veteran leader," Draymond Green said. "He's been playing well, but just his presence also has meant a lot to this team.

"D-West is just kind of a no-bull---- type of a guy. He doesn't say much. But when he does, you know it means a lot. And everybody hears him."

Said West: "It's just about adjusting and learning personalities. Obviously, this group has been very successful. I just try to add my 2 cents where I feel like it fits. Try not to over-talk people. I speak to guys directly and just make sure that we're all on the same page."

West is in his 14th season. Drafted by the New Orleans Hornets in 2003, he also has played for the Pacers and, last season, the Spurs, before joining the Warriors in July.

The question at the time was whether he still had a lot to give. West is a two-time All-Star and one of the most widely respected players in the league. But did he still have the legs to compete at a high level?

The answer is visible, particularly over the past month, since he returned from fractured left thumb on Feb. 23. West is shooting 53.0 percent from the field, he's rebounding consistently and he has proven to be a spectacularly good passer -- easily one of the best in the league among big men.

Earlier this week, to quell any lingering concerns about how much athleticism he still has, West rose up and dunked over a crowd of three Dallas Mavericks. It was clock-cleaning at its finest.

"I'm just getting more comfortable," West said, referring to his game and his locker-room influence. "We've developed good chemistry, communicating, harping on our defense more than anything else at this moment, because we feel that's going to give us a chance if shots aren't falling."

West is on a one-year deal for the veteran's minimum, $1.55 million. He sacrificed bigger dollars for a chance at his first championship. He's doing his part. And he neither takes nor leaves any mess.



Photo Credit: Monte Poole]]>
<![CDATA[Nunes Backs Down From Assertion Trump Was Monitored]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:51:15 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/656523922-devin-nunes-trump-intelligence.jpg

The chairman of the House intelligence committee has backed down from his assertion that Donald Trump and his aides were "monitored" by U.S. spies — a claim the Republicans have cited this week in emails to loyalists.

As NBC News reports, Rep. Devin Nunes told reporters Friday he can't be sure whether conversations among Trump or his aides were captured in the surveillance that has become a source of controversy since Nunes made it public in two news conferences this week.

A spokesman for Nunes, Jack Langer, asserted that the Congressman did not explicitly say Trump was spied on when he briefed reporters Wednesday that he was "very concerned," that "the intelligence community incidentally collected information about American citizens involved in the Trump transition."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Expect a bit of break in the weather from Saturday morning into early afternoon.]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:43:01 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/KNTV_000000021647937_1200x675_906264644000.jpg

Our Friday storm delivered 1”-3” in the North Bay and coastal mountains with generally less than .50” elsewhere from SF into San Jose. We’re expecting a bit of break in the weather from Saturday morning into early afternoon with lingering showers shutting down. However increasing clouds on Sunday will lead to some renewed rain chances more so for the second half of the day into Monday morning. As this weekend storm clears, we are expecting high pressure to build in strongly to keep storms to our north and should help boost valley temps into the 70s approaching the middle of next week.]]>
<![CDATA[Ryan Falls Short in First Test of Trump Presidency: Analysis]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:37:40 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Speaker-Ryan-health-test.jpg

House Speaker Paul Ryan guaranteed a win on the Republican plan to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law. Instead, he suffered a brutal defeat, cancelling a vote and admitting "we're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future."

Friday's painful rebuke is an ominous sign for President Donald Trump's agenda, from taxes to infrastructure to the budget. Looming in a few weeks is the need to agree on a bill to keep the government open. After the health care debacle, Trump told Republican leaders he's moving on.

The episode is a danger point for the relationship between Trump and Ryan, who had an awkward pairing during the campaign but worked in tandem on the GOP health measure.

"I like Speaker Ryan," Trump said. "I think Paul really worked hard."

Virtually every congressional Republican won election promising to repeal Obamacare. With a Republican in the White House, passage seemed almost guaranteed.

Ryan was steeped in the details, even at one point replicating for a nationwide cable news audience a detailed PowerPoint presentation he delivered to his members.

Earlier this month, he said flatly, "We'll have 218 (votes) when this thing comes to the floor, I can guarantee you that."

Ryan was thrust into the speaker's chair after the stunning 2015 resignation of John Boehner, R-Ohio, and a failed bid by Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. At the time, Ryan held his dream job — chairman of the powerful, tax-writing Ways and Means Committee — but took the job as the last viable option to lead a fractured House GOP.

While Ryan eased comfortably into the job, he's not the schmoozer Boehner was, a key skill in delivering like-minded but reluctant lawmakers. He lacked the steel and seasoning of Democratic rival Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who delivered Obamacare in the first place — and that took months, not weeks.

Even before the bill went down, Pelosi was piling on, taunting Trump and, by implication, Ryan, for rushing the bill to the floor too early.

"You build your consensus in your caucus, and when you're ready, you set the date to bring it to the floor," Pelosi said. "Rookie's error, Donald Trump. You may be a great negotiator. Rookie's error for bringing this up on a day when clearly you're not ready."

Ryan entered the health care debate without the experience of having ever managed a situation of such magnitude.

"We were a 10-year opposition party where being against things was easy to do," a clearly disappointed Ryan said Friday. "And now, in three months' time, we've tried to go to a governing party, where we have to actually get ... people to agree with each other in how we do things."

During former President Barack Obama's tenure, Ryan had always been able to lean on Democrats to pass legislation Obama would sign.

On health care, however, Ryan could only count on Republicans, inheriting a fractious group that was schooled in opposing Obama, but lacking in the required team spirit to be a functioning, governing party.

It's a far different situation facing Ryan than he witnessed when joining the House in 1999. Then, Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., and legendary Whip Tom DeLay, R-Texas, ran the House with a five-vote majority, instilling a team spirit that is wholly lacking today. Ryan also lacks the tools available to prior leaders, like hometown earmarks.

"It's sometimes easier to do things with a smaller majority, because you all realize you've got to stick together or you won't get anything done," said Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho. "When you get a bigger majority you have factions. And then the challenge is dealing with the different factions."

Instead, Ryan struggled — and failed — to thread the needle between conservative hardliners in the House Freedom Caucus and moderate lawmakers worried that the GOP measure would harm their constituents — and their political prospects in midterm elections that promise to be bruising for Republicans.

While Trump focused on winning over the Freedom Caucus, Ryan failed to keep more pragmatic lawmakers like Rep. David Young, R-Iowa, in line. When Young announced his opposition, a superPAC affiliated with Ryan, the Congressional Leadership Fund, announced it would pull its support from Young.

To be sure, several factors conspired against Ryan.

Trump sometimes sent mixed signals about how solidly he was behind the effort. The White House is short-handed and its staff is inexperienced in the art of legislating.

And Ryan's vote-counting team failed at basic tasks like keeping lawmakers, including the chairman of the powerful Appropriations Committee, Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J., from issuing public statements promising to oppose the bill.

"We don't browbeat our folks," said Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga. "That's why it's harder to keep Republicans in line."

Ryan's stature appears secure. And even if Trump and his allies were upset with Ryan, there's no obvious replacement, given the party's short leadership roster.

"I don't think this will impact Speaker Ryan because everyone in our conference, whether you're voting yes or no, does know he put his heart and soul into this," said Rep. Chris Collins, a Trump ally. "I am certainly not blaming Paul Ryan in the least."

"He's highly respected. He worked very hard on this," said Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa. "He went in for the right reasons."

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: J. Scott Applewhite, AP]]>
<![CDATA[Instant Replay: Short-handed Kings Can't Keep With Warriors]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:31:17 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/kings-warriors-instant.jpg

BOX SCORE

The short-handed Sacramento Kings got off to a quick start Friday night at Oracle Arena, but in the end, the high-powered Golden State Warriors were just too much to handle. Golden State jumped all over the Kings in the third quarter and coasted down the stretch for the 114-110 victory.

Draymond Green torched the Kings. The versatile forward stuffed the stat sheet, finishing the night with 23 points, eight assists, four steals and two boards.

Reigning NBA MVP Stephen Curry went nuts in the fourth quarter. The sharpshooting guard managed to post 27 points, 12 assists, seven rebounds and six steals on the night.

JaVale McGee scored nine points and grabbed 10 rebounds. Ian Clark added 10 on 5-of-9 shooting and Andre Iguodala chipped in nine off the bench.

Starting for the resting Darren Collison, Ty Lawson went off for Sacramento. The 8-year NBA vet scored 18 of his 20 points in the first half. He shot an impressive 8-for-9 from the field and handed out two assists in the loss.

Buddy Hield held his own against Klay Thompson. The rookie shooting guard set new career-highs across the board, finishing 22 points, seven assists and eight rebounds.

The bench unit played well against the best the Western Conference has to offer. Ben McLemore led the reserves with 11 points on 5-of-10 shooting. Skal Labissiere added 10 points, 10 rebounds and a career-best eight assists, while Georgios Papagiannis dropped in seven points and four rebounds in 26 minutes of action.

Willie Cauley-Stein added 12 points and four rebounds as the Kings dropped their fourth straight contest.

STANDOUT PERFORMER

After missing the previous game, Lawson put on a show. The pint-sized point guard singlehandedly kept the Kings in the game in the first half and finished the night with a season-high 20 points.

TURNING POINT

The Kings got sloppy in the third quarter and the Warriors dropped the hammer. After trailing by just seven at the half, Sacramento fell behind 92-72 going to the fourth.

INJURY UPDATE

Darren Collison, Tyreke Evans and Anthony Tolliver all sat as scheduled rest. Rookie Malachi Richardson is out with a right hamstring thickness tear, but is expected back soon. Rudy Gay is out for the year with a torn left Achilles.

WHAT'S NEXT

The Kings travel to Los Angeles following the game where they will take on the Clippers Sunday afternoon.



Photo Credit: James Ham]]>
<![CDATA[Bay Area Trump Supporters React to Failed Attempt to Repeal 'Obamacare']]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:41:25 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/03-24-2017-trump-care.jpg

A presidential campaign promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act fails when it comes time to vote. Jean Elle reports.

Photo Credit: NBC Bay Area]]>
<![CDATA[Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s 600th Race]]>Sat, 25 Mar 2017 00:19:22 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/214*120/daleearnhardt.jpg

While Dale Earnhardt Jr. prepared for his 600th NASCAR Cup Series race this weekend, he couldn't help thinking about his first time.

He still recalls his conversation with Tony Eury Jr., his cousin and crew chief, as he sat on that starting grid in Charlotte in 1999.

"I remember telling Tony that I would switch with him for a million dollars so he could do this instead of me," Earnhardt recalled Friday with a chuckle. "Because I was scared to death. ... I was overwhelmed with the weight of the situation, and how much attention it was getting, and it made it really hard to soak in and enjoy it, I guess.

"We just wanted to do so well and not fail. It was fun. It was a wild time."

The son of racing royalty once felt crushed by expectations, yet he persevered and established his own legacy in the sport. Along with being NASCAR's most popular driver for most of his career, Junior has 26 victories, 252 top-10 finishes and two Daytona 500 trophies in his first 599 races.

"I just wanted to drive," the 42-year-old Earnhardt recalled. "I wanted to race cars for a living. I wanted to do it well enough to be able to afford to make a living doing it. I didn't have vision or assume that I was going to make all of the money and success that we have made, but all I really wanted to do was to do it long enough so I didn't have to get a real job."

Earnhardt has done it effectively and consistently for 17 straight years. Only 24 drivers in NASCAR history have started 600 races, and Earnhardt would love to celebrate his entry into the club Sunday with his first win on the well-aged asphalt at Fontana, where he has typically run well for most of his storied career.

Earnhardt hasn't won a race since late 2015, and he has never won at Fontana in 24 starts despite finishing second twice and landed inside the top 12 in six consecutive outings at Auto Club Speedway.

He missed the second half of last season with a concussion, at least the fourth of his racing career. The absence was his longest break from competition since his debut season back in the 20th century, but he has returned with optimism and confidence, if not results: He hasn't finished higher than 14th in the first four races of this season, leaving him 23rd in the standings.

Yet Earnhardt has evolved into an elder statesman of the garage, and his easygoing personality even allows him to squash most beefs with a smile — and some beer.

After Ryan Blaney cursed him out on the radio last week in Phoenix, Earnhardt played it off by texting with his young rival — and forcing Blaney to furnish the beverages whenever they hang out this spring.

Blaney incurred the wrath of Earnhardt's legion of fans, particularly on social media, but Junior himself took it good-naturedly. Blaney had ample reason to make good with his neighbor in North Carolina.

"He owns the land that I live on," Blaney said with a grimace. "So strategically, that may not have been the best thing for me to do that to him last week, but we're good. He's a great guy and a good friend of mine."

While he crosses his latest historic mark, Earnhardt doesn't appear to be done soon. He confirmed Friday that he intends to begin talks soon with Hendrick Motorsports about a new contract to replace his expiring deal.

"It's only been a few races, but I feel really good and we have had some discussions about planning to get together," Earnhardt said. "It's not something that I put on the shelf, for sure. We're getting closer and closer."

Although he realizes some fans, including legendary driver Richard Petty, would have liked to see him retire for his health after that last concussion, Earnhardt is feeling new appreciation for the simpler aspects of this high-profile job.

"You get older, you start to understand how you prioritize the things that are most important to you about the sport," Earnhardt said. "The camaraderie and the friendships that I've made kind of started down the list, and as I've gotten older, that has crept up the list. If it's not No. 1, I don't know what is.

"That probably is what you will miss the most once you are done driving, is the people."

Copyright Associated Press / NBC Bay Area



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Highly-Anticipated Warm Springs BART Station Unveiled]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:28:05 -0700http://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Warm-Springs-BART-PHOTO.jpg

It's a day Bay Area commuters have been waiting on for years: the Warm Springs BART station is hours away from being open for service. Cheryl Hurd reports.]]>