New Bundles of Animal Joy Arrive in San Diego - NBC Bay Area
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New Bundles of Animal Joy Arrive in San Diego

A sweet Somali wild ass calf is now prancing at San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

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    The adorable foal was born on March 17. She's been seen "frolicking with four yearlings" and sticking close to her mom

    WHEN APRIL ARRIVES, and we begin to bask in all of the blooms that arrive with it, our thoughts also turn to the sweet chicks and kids and lambs and other babies that are part of the eternal spring scene. For animals giving birth to smaller baby animals is as April an occurrence as a rose bush covered in blossoms, and a heart-gladdening sight, too. You can find these furry and fluffy little ones at local farms, yes, and agricultural destinations, but our animal parks and zoos are also fine places to spot wee critters getting to know the world, a world that is all so new to their very young eyes. Those adorable wallaby joeys just made their coo-worthy debuts at San Diego Zoo Safari Park in the spring of 2018, but there's another superstar bringing the sighs to the famous destination. The month-old...

    SOMALI WILD ASS CALF... was born on March 17, and while she doesn't yet have a name, she has plenty of pluck. She's been seen romping with a quartet of yearlings, and hanging in the proximity of the six adults in her herd, but, of course, she loves Mom best, and is still keeping close and nursing throughout the day. The animal park describes the Somali wild ass as "the smallest of African equid species," and part of the larger horse and zebra family. Listed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species as "Endangered," the Somali wild ass remains a special focus for the park. "The San Diego Zoo Safari Park is one of three facilities in North America with Somali wild ass," says keeper Justin Kranz. "It is important to breed these endangered animals in managed care to keep the population as genetically diverse as possible." Want to see the sweet girl as she enjoys her herd? Stop by the park this spring to admire the calf and,  of course, the pair of new wallaby joeys, too.