Body of SF Officer's Wife Returned as Gun Control Fight Heats Up - NBC Bay Area
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Body of SF Officer's Wife Returned as Gun Control Fight Heats Up

SF police officers escort the body of Stacee Etcheber from SFO to funeral home in Novato

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The body of Stacee Etcheber, who was one of 58 people killed a week ago in the Las Vegas massacre, was returned to waiting family in Novato on Sunday as the gun control debate heated up in Washington. Christie Smith reports. (Published Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017)

    The body of Stacee Etecheber, who was one of 58 people killed a week ago in the Las Vegas massacre, was returned to waiting family in Novato on Sunday.

    The wife of a San Francisco police officer arrived at San Francisco International Airport and was escorted by SFPD officers to a funeral home.

    Meanwhile, as victims' families continue to grieve and heal, lawmakers continue to spar over gun control. The topic dominated the Sunday morning talk shows.

    "Look, how many of these events to do we have to have happen with these devices before we do something about it?” Sen. Dianne Feinstein said on "Face the Nation."

    Feinstein admitted no law could have stopped the attack since the gunman passed all background checks. But she, along with other gun control advocates, said there are other measures to take, such as limiting the use of bump stocks.

    A bump stock allows a semi-automatic weapon to mimic an automatic weapon.

    "I don’t want to do anything that violates the Constitution," said Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., "but there are common sense things we can do if Democrats and Republicans come together to reduce violence in our community."

    Republican Rep. Steve Scalise, who was shot in June at a congressional baseball practice, said he stands for an unlimited right to bear arms.

    "Look, Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi already said she wants it to be a slippery slope. She doesn't want to stop at bump stocks," Scalise said. "They want to go out and limit the rights of gun owners."

    The National Rifle Association is calling for reviews and not necessarily a ban of bump stocks. The NRA wants the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms to regulate sales and for Congress to not get involved.

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