<![CDATA[NBC Bay Area - Bay Area Local News - Clear the Shelters]]>Copyright 2018http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/localen-usFri, 19 Oct 2018 18:20:07 -0700Fri, 19 Oct 2018 18:20:07 -0700NBC Local Integrated Media<![CDATA[Top Stories]]>Mon, 22 Aug 2016 07:19:11 -0700]]><![CDATA[Before You Adopt]]>Mon, 22 Aug 2016 07:19:11 -0700]]><![CDATA[Videos]]>Thu, 07 Jun 2018 15:48:24 -0700]]><![CDATA[MAP: Find a Participating Shelter Near You]]>Thu, 02 Aug 2018 13:32:35 -0700]]><![CDATA[]]>Thu, 02 Aug 2018 13:43:24 -0700]]><![CDATA[Amazing Animal Stories]]>Mon, 22 Aug 2016 07:19:11 -0700]]><![CDATA[After You Adopt]]>Mon, 22 Aug 2016 07:19:11 -0700]]><![CDATA[Full Archive]]>Fri, 10 Aug 2018 09:15:32 -0700]]><![CDATA[Second Chances]]>Mon, 22 Aug 2016 07:19:11 -0700]]><![CDATA[Empty the Shelters Adopt-a-Thon]]>Thu, 04 Oct 2018 13:48:16 -0700https://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/315*120/bissellETS.JPG

Berkeley Humane and the BISSELL Pet Foundation have joined together once again to help you find the love of that special dog or cat at Empty the Shelters on Saturday, October 6, 2018.
October 4, 2018 from approximately 10:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, October 6, 2018 from 10:30 a.m. until approximately 5 p.m, Cathy Bissell and the Hallmark Channel’s Emmy-nominated daily lifestyle show, “Home & Family,” will be filming at Berkeley Humane to capture incredible stories of adoption.
For more information about Empty the Shelters, including all adoption locations and a list of all participating shelters and rescue organizations, please visit www.bissellpetfoundation.org/ets and follow BISSELL Pet Foundation on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter (@bissellpets).
WHEN: Empty the Shelters event is Saturday, October 6, 2018, and open to the public from 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Hallmark and Cathy Bissell will be onsite again on Saturday.
WHERE: Berkeley Humane, 2700 Ninth Street, Berkeley, CA

Berkeley Humane and the BISSELL Pet Foundation have joined together once again to help you find the love of that special dog or cat at Empty the Shelters on Saturday, October 6, 2018.

On October 4, 2018 from approximately 10:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. and Saturday, October 6, 2018 from 10:30 a.m. until approximately 5 p.m, Cathy Bissell and the Hallmark Channel’s Emmy-nominated daily lifestyle show, “Home & Family,” will be filming at Berkeley Humane to capture incredible stories of adoption.

For more information about Empty the Shelters, including all adoption locations and a list of all participating shelters and rescue organizations, please visit www.bissellpetfoundation.org/ets and follow BISSELL Pet Foundation on Facebook and Instagram and Twitter (@bissellpets).

WHEN: Empty the Shelters event is Saturday, October 6, 2018, and open to the public from 11:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Hallmark and Cathy Bissell will be onsite again on Saturday.

WHERE: Berkeley Humane, 2700 Ninth Street, Berkeley, CA



Photo Credit: Bissell Pet Foundation]]>
<![CDATA[Pet First Aid and CPR Class]]>Tue, 11 Sep 2018 12:40:12 -0700https://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/160*183/BerkeleyHumane_Logo_2014_transparentno+tagline.png

 

There is no 911 for your dog or cat. What would you do if your pet was injured and medical care was not readily available?
The recent wildfires are a good reminder that your family disaster preparedness efforts need to include your pets. Berkeley Humane will be hosting a Pet First Aid and CPR class on Saturday, October 13, 2019.
“We are teaching this class in recognition of the 29th Anniversary of the Loma Prieta Earthquake,” said Jeffrey Zerwekh, Executive Director of Berkeley Humane. “After a major emergency help may not be available right away, if your pet is injured, we want you to be equipped to care for them, potentially even save their life.”
The participants will learn the prior planning and preparation necessary to respond effectively to an animal medical emergency. It will be taught through lecture, discussion and hands on activities. Pet First Aid and CPR is the immediate and temporary care given to an injured or ill dog or cat to sustain life and to minimize further harm and suffering until the animal reaches medical care in the form of an emergency clinic or veterinarian.
Students will receive a Pet first Aid handout and a Certificate of Completion. Participants must be at least 12 years of age and able to undertake moderate physical activity. The class is for people only. No pets allowed.
WHEN: Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
WHERE: Berkeley Humane: 2700 Ninth St., Berkeley, CA 94710

 

There is no 911 for your dog or cat. What would you do if your pet was injured and medical care was not readily available?

The recent wildfires are a good reminder that your family disaster preparedness efforts need to include your pets. Berkeley Humane will be hosting a Pet First Aid and CPR class on Saturday, October 13, 2019.

“We are teaching this class in recognition of the 29th Anniversary of the Loma Prieta Earthquake,” said Jeffrey Zerwekh, Executive Director of Berkeley Humane. “After a major emergency help may not be available right away, if your pet is injured, we want you to be equipped to care for them, potentially even save their life.”

The participants will learn the prior planning and preparation necessary to respond effectively to an animal medical emergency. It will be taught through lecture, discussion and hands on activities. Pet First Aid and CPR is the immediate and temporary care given to an injured or ill dog or cat to sustain life and to minimize further harm and suffering until the animal reaches medical care in the form of an emergency clinic or veterinarian.

Students will receive a Pet first Aid handout and a Certificate of Completion. Participants must be at least 12 years of age and able to undertake moderate physical activity. The class is for people only. No pets allowed.

To purchase tickets, please click here.

WHEN: Saturday, October 13, 2018, 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

WHERE: Berkeley Humane: 2700 Ninth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710



Photo Credit: Berkeley Humane]]>
<![CDATA[Morgan Hill Shelter Chosen for The Jackson Galaxy Project’s Cat Pawsitive Pro Program]]>Thu, 06 Sep 2018 17:19:56 -0700https://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/Town+Cats+Pawsitive.jpg

 

Town Cats of Morgan Hill is selected by The Jackson Galaxy Project (JGP), a Signature Program of GreaterGood.org, to participate in the Autumn 2018 Semester of Cat Pawsitive Pro, a life-saving initiative that introduces positive-reinforcement training to shelter cats. Supported by the Petco Foundation and Halo® pet food, this innovative training program for shelter cats aims to increase feline adoption rates as well as educate the shelter staff and volunteers on how to implement it.
Jackson Galaxy, star of the television show My Cat from Hell on Animal Planet and founder of JGP, developed Cat Pawsitive Pro with a team of feline behavior experts. Cats who are exposed to reward-based training methods of Cat Pawsitive Pro gain confidence, experience reduced stress levels and build connections with staff, volunteers and potential adopters. The program can help a shy cat learn to feel comfortable coming up to the front of her cage to meet an adopter, a feisty cat learn to play nice and an outgoing kitty learn to give an endearing "high five" to his visitors to seal an adoption deal.
Carrie Seay, a feline behavior expert hand-picked by The JGP, will lead the program for the shelter beginning August 23rd. Throughout the fall, Town Cats staff and volunteers will participate in weekly seminars with Seay and will have direct access to the entire training team for specialized consultations about the cats in their care.
Some highlights of the program include: improving cat “adoptability” and feline social skills, particularly for shy or fearful cats and long-term residents, enriching day-to-day life for cats in shelters with physical and mental activity, promoting the human-cat bond, teaching and empowering animal shelter staff and volunteers.
Galaxy will be sharing highlights of the program on The Jackson Galaxy Project’s Facebook , Twitter and Instagram pages. Learn more about Cat Pawsitive at www.catpawsitive.org.

 

Town Cats of Morgan Hill is selected by The Jackson Galaxy Project (JGP), a Signature Program of GreaterGood.org, to participate in the Autumn 2018 Semester of Cat Pawsitive Pro, a life-saving initiative that introduces positive-reinforcement training to shelter cats. Supported by the Petco Foundation and Halo® pet food, this innovative training program for shelter cats aims to increase feline adoption rates as well as educate the shelter staff and volunteers on how to implement it.

Jackson Galaxy, star of the television show My Cat from Hell on Animal Planet and founder of JGP, developed Cat Pawsitive Pro with a team of feline behavior experts. Cats who are exposed to reward-based training methods of Cat Pawsitive Pro gain confidence, experience reduced stress levels and build connections with staff, volunteers and potential adopters. The program can help a shy cat learn to feel comfortable coming up to the front of her cage to meet an adopter, a feisty cat learn to play nice and an outgoing kitty learn to give an endearing "high five" to his visitors to seal an adoption deal.

Some highlights of the program include: improving cat “adoptability” and feline social skills, particularly for shy or fearful cats and long-term residents, enriching day-to-day life for cats in shelters with physical and mental activity, promoting the human-cat bond, teaching and empowering animal shelter staff and volunteers.

Carrie Seay, a feline behavior expert hand-picked by The JGP, will lead the program for the shelter beginning August 23rd. Throughout the fall, Town Cats staff and volunteers will participate in weekly seminars with Seay and will have direct access to the entire training team for specialized consultations about the cats in their care.

Galaxy will be sharing highlights of the program on The Jackson Galaxy Project’s Facebook , Twitter and Instagram pages. Learn more about Cat Pawsitive at www.catpawsitive.org.



Photo Credit: Town Cats of Morgan Hill]]>
<![CDATA[Thousands of Pets Find New Homes During Clear The Shelters]]>Sat, 18 Aug 2018 14:01:48 -0700https://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/SAMPLE+TIMELINE.00_00_36_21.Still003.jpg

Across the country thousands of animals are finding forever homes. Watch some of these lucky pets as they meet their new families for the very first time.]]>
<![CDATA[More than 1,100 Bay Area Animals Find Their Forever Homes]]>Sat, 18 Aug 2018 23:33:47 -0700https://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/213*120/WEBSTILLDogBerkeley_3898923.JPEG

Cats, dogs, rabbits and other animals, young and old, are waiting to be adopted into forever homes in the Bay Area on Saturday as a part of NBC Bay Area's #ClearTheShelters adoption initiative.

Holly, a sweet canine who was born on the streets of Puerto Rico, was sent to Miami to be adopted but due to the devastating Hurricane Irma, she had to move again. She was flown to Berkeley where she would eventually meet a couple who took her into their home.

"If I can give a shelter animal a good home, whether they're traumatized or not, I'm doing what I should be doing," said Holly's new family, Erik Hesse, a UC Berkeley professor.

Another dog that was in Berkeley Saturday came from Redding after the area was devastated by the Carr Fire. Maya was adopted at the Berkeley Humane Society along with more than 1,100 other animals all over the Bay Area.

Clear the Shelters, the fourth annual pet adoption drive sponsored by the NBC- and Telemundo-owned television stations, culminates today with more than 1,200 shelters participating in dozens of communities across the country.

Click here for information on the participating locations across the Bay Area.


Since this year’s event was launched on July 28, more than 42,000 pets have already been taken. To encourage families to find a new pet, whether puppies, older cats, rabbits or iguanas, many of the participating animal shelters and rescue organizations are reducing or waiving adoption fees.

The need remains great. The number of animals entering shelters each year is about 6.5 million, 3.3 million dogs and 3.2 million cats, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Though the number has declined from about 7.2 million in 2011, with the biggest drop in the number dogs, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized each year.

On the happier side, about 3.2 million shelter animals are adopted annually and another 710,000 are returned to their owners.

Clear the Shelters began in North Texas in 2014 as a partnership among the NBC and Telemundo stations in Dallas-Fort Worth and dozens of North Texas animal shelters. More than 2,200 homeless animals were adopted that first year, the most in a single day in North Texas.

A year later that number jumped to nearly 20,000 as the adoption drive went national, with more than 400 shelters taking part across the country. Last year, as the event was extended over a month, more than 80,000 pets were adopted from over 900 shelters.

So far this year, 76, 348 pets have been adopted nationwide bringing the total number of animals that have been adopted since the campaign began in 2015 to 229,982. 




Photo Credit: NBC Bay Area
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Adoptable Pets Near You]]>Fri, 17 Aug 2018 07:33:04 -0700]]><![CDATA[A Once Scared and Sad Chihuahua Finds Forever Home with Veterinarian]]>Thu, 16 Aug 2018 14:37:55 -0700https://media.nbcbayarea.com/images/323*120/JuniorSVACA.JPG

Junior, a four-year-old Chihuahua mix arrived at Silicon Valley Animal Control Authority after kind citizens found him scared, alone and lost.

Upon intake, Junior showed some pretty serious fear aggression. Difficult to even give a cursory exam to, staff didn’t know what his future held.

The exam revealed that he had severe dental disease. This explained his grouchiness since it was probably very difficult to eat.

His owners never came looking for him and staff knew with his behavioral and dental issues he might be difficult to place.

They immediately started him on an intense socialization program where he started off spending a lot of time in the office of SVACA’s shelter manager.

He was exposed to many people throughout the day. After a few weeks, Junior blossomed into an outgoing, playful, loving, attention-seeking pup, but mostly toward the shelter manager.

The staff knew then that there was hope after all and started having different staff members socialize him each day.

He would eventually learn that whoever he interacted with was safe and a friend. It took some time and effort but he eventually caught on and before they knew it, he was bonding with the entire staff.

They decided to place him up for adoption after some dental work and there he continued to make friends with staff and volunteers.

He was still selective with new people but his behavior had greatly improved.

After about three months one of SVACA’s veterinarians was looking for a canine companion to adopt.

She decided he needed to come home with her. She had done his neuter surgery several months before and recognized this now happy guy.

Their reunion was sweet and from that moment on they became inseparable. Junior is one lucky boy!



Photo Credit: Silicon Valley Animal Control Authority]]>