Voters in Brentwood to Decide on Expanding City Limits For New Development - NBC Bay Area
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Voters in Brentwood to Decide on Expanding City Limits For New Development

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    Voters in Brentwood to Decide on Expanding City Limits

    Brentwood is growing, and a measure on the November ballot aims to help fund that growth. But some in the Contra Costa County city believe growth should be kept to a minimum. Cheryl Hurd reports. (Published Monday, Oct. 7, 2019)

    Brentwood is growing, and a measure on the November ballot aims to help fund that growth.

    But some in the Contra Costa County city believe growth should be kept to a minimum.

    Sinziana Todor is one of those residents opposed to Measure L, which would expand Brentwood’s urban limit line and allow a developer to build 2,400 new homes on 800 acres of land over 20 years.

    "I moved here 23 years ago in a quest of finding a home for my family," Todor said, emphasizing her attraction to the open space and limited growth. "I am against Measure L because it really overrides everything Brentwood stands for. To keep the small community feel, we need to keep it small."

    Retired Brentwood police officer and current business owner Kevin King wants people to vote yes on Measure L. He says the city is no longer small. The roads need improvement around the schools to cut down on horrible traffic on Balfour and American Avenue, he said. And he’s concerned if the city doesn’t take over the private land, another city will.

    "Growth is going to happen anyway," King said. "The developer is offering a substantial funding to the fire district out here, which is in dire straits."

    Todor countered: "There’s nothing itemized that says, 'I’m going to write you a check when we break ground.'"

    In 1994, 8,000 people lived in Brentwood. Now, 25 years later, the population is 64,000 and growing. The city is a desirable location, with a median household income close to $90,000 a year and homes selling from $500,000 to $1.2 million.

    "We don’t want to encourage urban sprawl, and by saying yes to this madness, it will open the gates to other developments," Todor said.

    King: "They want to use the excuses of traffic as a detriment to the city. The project brings traffic mediation."

    Measure L will be on the ballot Nov. 5.

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