YouTube Shooter Was Upset Over Company's Rule Changes: Police - NBC Bay Area
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YouTube Shooter Was Upset Over Company's Rule Changes: Police

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Examining New Payment Rules at YouTube

    As each hour passes there are more revelations about the YouTube shooter. Nasim Aghdam was extremely bitter with the San Bruno company saying YouTube changed its policy and ultimately paid her less for her content. Agdham is not the only one upset with YouTube's new payment structure. Plenty of people worldwide are accusing the company of unfair business practice. But do they have a valid gripe? Jean Elle reports.

    (Published Wednesday, April 4, 2018)

    The woman police said shot three YouTube employees on Tuesday might have done so partly because she was angry at recent changes by the company that affected those who post videos on the social media site.

    So-called YouTubers posted on the site for profit. And for a while, users could post just about anything. The process was simple: if users clicked on an ad or if YouTubers attracted 10,000 viewers, money was made.

    But that changed recently.

    Earlier this year, YouTube made it harder for users to make money, while also reviewing and cracking down on more of their content.

    Among those complaining, Nasim Aghdam, who said in a series of YouTube videos that she was angry at the company for changing the rules.

    Aghdam had, in one of her YouTube videos, complained about "discrimination and hatred problems against me."

    Police said Aghdam opened fire at YouTube's headquarters in San Bruno on Tuesday, wounding three people before taking her own life.

    "I understand her anger, but the way to handle it is legal means," said Chuck Mere, who helped create "Zombie Goes Boom" on YouTube. The page used to bring in $10,000 to $15,000 a month. After YouTube revamped its policies, Mere said revenue for his channel plummetted 90 percent overnight.

    Mere filed lawsuit against YouTube's parent company, Google, claiming fraudulent business practices. The suit was dismissed.

    As Mere and other content producers simmer, law enforcement continues to take a closer look at Aghdam by searching her parents home in Riverside County and near her apartment in San Diego.

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