Deutsche Bank Employees Reportedly Flagged Suspicious Transactions Involving Trump and Kushner - NBC Bay Area
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President Donald Trump

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Deutsche Bank Employees Reportedly Flagged Suspicious Transactions Involving Trump and Kushner

Deutsche Bank lent Trump and his businesses more than $2.5 billion and, when he became president, the bank held more than $300 million in Trump's debt

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    Anti-money laundering specialists at Deutsche Bank flagged multiple transactions involving Donald Trump and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, from 2016 and 2017. Those specialists recommended the activity be reported to the federal government's financial crimes unit, The New York Times reported Sunday.

    But top executives at the global financial giant rejected that advice, current and former employees told The Times, according to NBC News.

    The transactions that came under review "set off alerts in a computer system designed to detect illicit activity," five current and former Deutsche Bank employees told The Times. Those transactions were then reviewed by the bank's compliance staff, who prepared suspicious activity reports that they felt should be sent to the U.S. Treasury Department. Those reports were never filed, The Times reported. 

    The Times noted that those red flags "did not necessarily mean the transactions were improper."

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

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    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    "At no time was an investigator prevented from escalating activity identified as potentially suspicious," Kerrie McHugh, a Deutsche Bank spokeswoman, said in a statement. "Furthermore, the suggestion that anyone was reassigned or fired in an effort to quash concerns relating to any client is categorically false."