ICE Making Parents Separated From Kids Accept Deportation To Be Reunited - NBC Bay Area
Immigration in America

Immigration in America

Full coverage of immigration issues in the U.S.

ICE Making Parents Separated From Kids Accept Deportation To Be Reunited

Parents are asked to make their decision using a government form

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    The Dos and Don'ts of Good Sleep
    John Moore/Getty Images, File
    In this Oct. 14, 2015, file photo, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) official helps detain a suspect in Los Angeles, Calif.

    A week after President Donald Trump signed an executive order ending the separation of migrant families at the U.S. border, the administration has asked immigration agents to give detained parents a choice: Leave the country with your children or leave the country without them, according to NBC News.

    The practice of separating parents from their children came as a result of the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy that considered all adults crossing the border illegally to be suspected criminals and were therefore detained separately from their children, who would not be charged with crimes.

    Parents are asked to make their decision using a government form, a copy of which was obtained by NBC News. Advocates say that even migrants who have already passed their initial asylum screenings are being presented with the form.

    "We are seeing cases where people who have passed credible fear interviews and have pending asylum claims are being given this form," said Lee Gelernt, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union who is leading a class action lawsuit for family reunification.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)