Trump: EPA Chief Pruitt 'Doing Great Job But Is Totally Under Siege' - NBC Bay Area
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Trump: EPA Chief Pruitt 'Doing Great Job But Is Totally Under Siege'

In recent weeks, Scott Pruitt has been the subject of multiple negative reports that have raised ethics concerns

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    Carolyn Kaster/AP, File
    In this Feb. 12, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt is seen at the White House in Washington.

    President Donald Trump on Friday defended Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt as the embattled administrator faces mounting reports of lavish spending and questionable decisions related to his staff and housing arrangements, NBC News reported. 

    "Do you believe that the Fake News Media is pushing hard on a story that I am going to replace A.G. Jeff Sessions with EPA Chief Scott Pruitt, who is doing a great job but is TOTALLY under siege?" Trump wrote in a Friday morning tweet. 

    "Do people really believe this stuff?" he added. "So much of the media is dishonest and corrupt!"

    In recent weeks, Pruitt has been the subject of multiple negative reports that have raised ethics concerns about his frequent first class travel, his sweetheart deal to rent a condo from the wife of an energy lobbyist, and big pay raises reportedly afforded to top aides without White House approval.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)