US to Impose New Russia Sanctions Over Spy Poisoning in UK - NBC Bay Area
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

US to Impose New Russia Sanctions Over Spy Poisoning in UK

Russia failed to meet a deadline to comply with U.S. laws on preventing chemical weapon use, the State Department said

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    The Dos and Don'ts of Good Sleep
    Alexander Zemlianichenko, Pool via AP, File
    Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018.

    The Trump administration said Tuesday that it is consulting with Congress about additional sanctions on Russia over the poisoning of an ex-Russian spy in Britain, in a move that is likely to further strain already tense relations.

    The State Department said in a statement that Russia has failed to meet a 90-day deadline that fell on Tuesday to comply with a 1991 U.S. law on preventing the use of chemical weapons.

    The United States and its allies have accused the Russian government of involvement in the March nerve agent attack on Sergei Skripal and his daughter in the English city of Salisbury. The State Department determined in August that Russia violated the chemicals law in the Skripal case. Moscow strongly denies that it was behind the attack.

    Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a statement that the agency will now consult Congress on the fresh sanctions.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    "We intend to proceed in accordance with the terms of the CBW Act, which directs the implementation of additional sanctions," she said, referring to Biological Weapons Control and Warfare Elimination Act.

    Ties between Moscow and Washington are at Cold War lows despite President Donald Trump's hopes of building closer ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Russia already faces U.S. sanctions over its alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. election and its actions in Ukraine.

    Putin has said Russia had no reason to attack Skripal, who had served time in prison for spying for Britain and then was released in a spy swap deal in 2010. Moscow also denies meddling in U.S. politics.

    According to the credit agency Standard & Poor's, the Trump administration will be choosing three of the following six options for sanctions: restricting U.S. imports of Russian oil, banning U.S. technology and food exports, restricting Russia's access to international financial markets, prohibiting U.S. banks from giving loans to the Russian government, further downgrading diplomatic ties and restricting travel in the U.S. by Russia's Aeroflot airlines.

    Rep. Ed Royce, the Republican chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, called on the Trump administration "to act quickly" on sanctions.

    In September, Britain charged two Russian citizens with trying to kill Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, with the Soviet-designed nerve agent Novichok. The Skripals survived the attack, but spent weeks in the hospital.

    Hearing on Reparations Brings Testimony from Actor, Senator, Ex-NFL Player

    [NATL] Hearing on Reparations Brings Testimony from Actor, Senator, Ex-NFL Player

    Watch actor Donald Glover, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and former NFL player Owens Burgess testify before a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves.

     

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)

    Britain says "the operation was almost certainly approved at a senior government level."

    British-based investigative group Bellingcat has identified the two suspects as members of the Russian military intelligence unit known as GRU, one a military doctor and the other, a decorated agent.

    The men deny involvement, saying they traveled to Salisbury as tourists.

    Associated Press writer Matthew Lee contributed to this report.