Federal Bureau of Investigation

Evidence Doesn't Support Claim Against Kavanaugh, Prosecutor Says

"I do not think that a reasonable prosecutor would bring this case based on the evidence before the committee," she wrote

No reasonable prosecutor would bring sexual assault charges against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh based on the public evidence, the prosecutor whom Republicans hired to ask the questions during last week's Senate hearing said in a memo to senators, NBC News reported.

In the memo, which was sent to all Republican senators and was obtained Sunday night by NBC News, Rachel Mitchell, the deputy county attorney in charge of the Special Victims Division in Maricopa County, Arizona, said her "bottom line" was that "a 'he said, she said' case is incredibly difficult to prove."

"But this case is even weaker than that," Mitchell wrote. "Dr. Ford identified other witnesses to the event, and those witnesses either refuted her allegations or failed to corroborate them."

"I do not think that a reasonable prosecutor would bring this case based on the evidence before the committee," she wrote.

During her Senate testimony, Christine Blasey Ford said she was "100 percent" certain that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were in high school. Kavanaugh has strongly denied the allegation. 

Democrats and other opponents of Kavanaugh argued it was inappropriate to have a prosecutor question Ford in a nonjudicial setting.

The FBI is conducting a one-week supplementary investigation after the Judiciary Committee cleared Kavanaugh's nomination on a party-line vote last week.

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