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Honduran Youth Pastor Granted Asylum Under Trump's ‘Remain in Mexico' Policy

Douglas Oviedo is one of the first asylum seekers sent back across the border under the Trump administration's 'Remain in Mexico' policy.

A Honduran youth pastor who was just granted asylum in San Diego is now working to bring his wife and three children to the U.S.

Douglas Oviedo, 35, was one of the first asylum seekers sent back across the border under the Trump administration's 'Remain in Mexico' policy.

"Here, we are happy and overjoyed. The dream took a long time," said Oviedo.

He left Honduras because of death threats from gangs. His 3,000-mile journey to San Diego was also filled with risk.

"You put your life in danger because you don't know what's going to happen. The migrant lives with an uncertain future because you don't know what's coming ahead," said Oviedo.

During 11 months in Tijuana, Oviedo helped build a migrant shelter. While he advocates for other migrants, he is determined to reunite with his family.

"One day we'll be able to be together, I don't know when, but that's what I hope," said Oviedo.

The reunion won't be easy. The Trump Administration is expanding its 'Remain in Mexico' policy. Currently, migrants who come as a family, are released in the U.S. and monitored. Starting next week, they'll have to wait in Mexico.

"Tijuana has a terrific network of really dedicated migrant shelters, but they're over capacity," said Ev Meade, Professor at the University of San Diego, Joan B. Kroc School of Peace Studies.

"They're able to take people, but in most cases no longer than a few weeks," Meade added.

Meade says that while the U.S. has taken many steps to discourage migration, the number of families reaching the border continues to rise, putting a strain on immigration courts.

"I want people to think like humans, to think of us as people. They would do the same for their children," said Oviedo.

This week, the Department of Homeland Security said they'd sent back more than 42,000 people to wait for their asylum hearings in Mexico. The policy is still being challenged in court.

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