She's Got a Plan for That: Warren Tries to Break Out With Flurry of Policy Proposals - NBC Bay Area
Decision 2020

Decision 2020

The latest news on the race for president in 2020

She's Got a Plan for That: Warren Tries to Break Out With Flurry of Policy Proposals

When voters ask Sen. Elizabeth Warren about her plan for universal child care, she's likely to launch into a story about her Aunt Bee

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    Charlie Neibergall/AP
    Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks to local residents during a meet and greet, Sunday, May 26, 2019, in Ottumwa, Iowa.

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren has churned out a consistent stream of policy proposals since getting in the president race, with more than a dozen in-depth plans ranging from leveraging public lands in the fight against climate change to student loan debt forgiveness, NBC News reports. But while the consistent flurry of policy papers puts meat on the bone for reporters, as well as puts the pressure on fellow candidates, are voters clamoring for specifics?

    For Warren, perhaps nowhere does the answer to that question matter more than in Iowa — where she’s banking on consolidating support to springboard her into the top tier of candidates in the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses early next year.

    In more than a dozen conversations over three days recently at events for multiple candidates, including Warren, voters told NBC News they wanted to hear specifics before making their choice — and that Warren was cementing herself as "the policy candidate" in the field.

    "(Warren)'s the plan girl right now, isn't she?" Keith Kuper of Ackley told NBC News Saturday in Iowa Falls. "She really has specifics, plans on almost everything." 

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)