NASCAR's Austin Dillon 'Feeling Pretty Good' After Horrific Crash - NBC Bay Area
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NASCAR's Austin Dillon 'Feeling Pretty Good' After Horrific Crash

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    NASCAR driver Austin Dillon, who survived a horrific crash after his car went sailing into the protective fence at the Daytona Speedway Monday morning, said "the safety equipment did it's job."

    "I'm feeling pretty good this morning actually for what we went through," Dillon said on NBC's "Today" show Tuesday. "It was a heck of a crash and the safety equipment did it's job and I'm here today."

    Spectators and fellow drivers feared for Dillon's safety after his Chevy sailed upside down and careened into a fence before being slammed by two oncoming cars -- all at speeds estimated to be between 190 and 198 mph. Daytona President Joie Chitwood said 13 fans were attended to in the grandstands after the last-lap accident. 

    "You see a wreck like that and you shouldn't be talking to a person as early as you guys are talking to me today," Dillon told "Today's" Matt Lauer. He added that the safety measures implemented by NASCAR are among the reasons why he emerged from his mangled car with only a bruised tailbone and forearm.

    Dillon also addressed concerns many have over the safety of restrictor plate racing in which drivers race tightly bunched together at speeds of nearly 200 mph.

    "I think for this type of racing we could probably bring the speed down a little bit and get the same style of racing that we want to see out there for the fans. Obviously we don't want cars getting in the air. So, we'll work hard to do that," Dillon said.

    Meanwhile, Dillon said he is "just a little sore," but ready to get back in the hot seat this weekend at the Kentucky Speedway.

    "We signed up for this as drivers," said Dillon about the risks of his sport, particularly during restrictor plate races. "It's a part of our race and we go to Talladega and Daytona twice a year."